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Abstract

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the use and value of the Physiotherapy eSkills Training Online resource during work-integrated learning in naïve physiotherapy students. Method: A mixed methods study design was used. Participants: Forty-four final year physiotherapy students participating in neurological work-integrated learning units of study participated in this study. Intervention: Students had access to the Physiotherapy eSkills Training Online resource during their 6-week neurological work-integrated learning unit of study, which includes video footage and written information about 25 practical skills related to the physiotherapy management of stroke. Outcome Measures: Use of the Physiotherapy eSkills Training Online resource was examined by recording the number of hits on the resource, the number of students who accessed it, the number of times each student accessed it, and the time it was accessed. Students’ perception of the value of the resource was explored through semi-structured interviews. Results: There were 46 hits on the resource, by 13 (30%) students during the neurological work-integrated learning unit of study. Ten students accessed the resource twice or more. Double the number of hits occurred outside of work hours compared with during work hours. Qualitative analysis revealed five themes regarding the low usage of the resource by students: content of the resource; learning style; learning behavior and expectations; technical issues; and practical issues. Conclusion: Use of the resource was low, with only a small number of students using the resource on a few occasions. Value of the resource could not be clearly established.

Author Bio(s)

Elisabeth Preston, BPhty, MAppSc, PhD, is an Assistant Professor in the Discipline of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health, at the University of Canberra, Australia.

Cathy Chapple, BSc (Hons), Grad Dip Phty, MMPhty, PhD, is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Physiotherapy at the University of Otago, New Zealand.

Elizabeth Mayland, MSc, PhD, is a Lecturer in occupational therapy in the Faculty of Social Sciences at the University of Wollongong, Australia.

Louise Ada, BSc, GradDipPhty, MA, PhD, is an Emeritus Professor in the Discipline of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Sciences at University of Sydney, Australia.

Leigh Hale, BSc (Physio), MSC, PhD, FNZCP, is a Professor and Dean of the School of Physiotherapy at the University of Otago, New Zealand.




Acknowledgements

We would like to acknowledge the participants and clinical educators who volunteered to engage in this study.

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