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Abstract

Purpose: Developing research skills while improving research orientation among undergraduate students may increase evidence-based practice later in their professional careers.

Method: Undergraduate Health Science students (n=241) participated in a pretest-posttest design to determine the impact of a course that includes team-based, student initiated research projects completed within one semester. Modified versions of the Edmonton Research Orientation Survey (EROS) and the Barriers to Research Utilization Scale (BARRIERS) were completed at the beginning and end of the semesters.

Results: Students reported gains in six research skills and improvements in two of the Edmonton Research Orientation Survey subscales: involvement in research and evidence-based practice. Students reported reductions in all four Barriers to Research Utilization Scale subscales: adopter, organization, innovation, and communication.

Conclusion: Improvements in research orientation and reductions in perceived barriers due to high-impact learning activities may eventually facilitate evidence-based practice.

Author Bio(s)

Andrew A. Peachey, DrPH, is an Associate Professor and Acting Academic Unit Head in the Department of Health Sciences in the College of Health and Behavioral Studies at James Madison University.

Stephanie L. Baller, PhD, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Health Sciences in the College of Health and Behavioral Studies at James Madison University.

Carolyn F. Schubert, MLIS, is the Interim Director of Research & Education Services and the Health Sciences & Nursing Librarian at James Madison University.

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