•  
  •  
 

Abstract

Lemierre Syndrome (LS) is a rare, potentially life-threatening infection that typically develops from invasion of bacteria through pharyngeal mucosal tissue, followed by septic thrombophlebitis, most often involving the internal jugular vein.1 The primary complication of concern is the formation of septic emboli to the lungs or other organs. Fusobacterium necrophorum is the most common causative pathogen of LS.1 Typically, patients present with high fevers, sore throat, neck pain, and pulmonary symptoms. Though LS diagnosis is often overlooked because the initial manifestations may be subtle and non-specific, prompt diagnosis and treatment with antibiotics are imperative to prevent disease progression and promote quick recovery.

Author Bio(s)

1. Christian Summa, M.B.S, is a third year medical student at Dr. Kiran C. Patel College of Osteopathic Medicine.

2. Marcos Clavijo Fernandez is a third year medical student at Dr. Kiran C. Patel College of Osteopathic Medicine.

3. Jordan Simpson is a second year medical student at Dr. Kiran C. Patel College of Osteopathic Medicine.

4. Andrew Beckler, M.D. works for Center for Advanced Facial Plastic, Reconstructive and Cosmetic Surgery, Otolaryngology Consultants.

5. Michelle Demory Beckler Ph.D.is the Director of the Masters of Biomedical Sciences. She is also an Assistant Professor, Division of Microbiology and Immunology for Dr. Kiran C. Patel College of Allopathic Medicine.

Acknowledgements

The authors wish to extend their thanks to Beth Gilbert for her contribution to this study.

Share

 
COinS
 
 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.