•  
  •  
 

Abstract

Purpose: This study investigated the relationship between estimated oxygen consumption (VO2max) and handgrip strength (HGS) among healthy young Nigerian adults. Methods: This was a cross sectional study, which involved 400 volunteers (171 males; 229 females) aged between 18–40years. Participants’ HGS was assessed using a CAMRY EH-101 hand dynamometer while VO2max was estimated using a standard formula that includes measurement of resting heart rate. Demographic data was summarized using percentages, mean and standard deviation. Physical activity level of the participants was assessed using long form of the International Physical Activity Questionnaire. Independent t-test was used to compare the mean values of the variables between male and female participants. Pearson’s correlation was used to determine the strength of relationship between estimated VO2max and HGS, while multiple regression analysis was conducted to determine the predictors of estimated VO2max using HGS as well as body mass index (BMI), physical activity (PA) level, age and sex as co‐variates. Level of significance was set at p<0.05. Results: HGS, VO2max and PA level were significantly (p= 0.001) different between male and female participants. There was a significant moderate correlation between HGS and VO2max (r= 0.40, p= 0.001). The results of the regression analysis showed that HGS is not significant predictor of estimated VO2max; whereas, sex, BMI and PA level were significant predictors of estimated VO2max. Conclusion: Although HGS is moderately correlated with estimated VO2max, HGS may not be a relevant tool for predicting estimated VO2max in healthy young adults.

Author Bio(s)

Titilope O. Ajepe, Ph.D, is a lecturer in the Department of Physiotherapy, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Nigeria.

Nnamdi C. Mgbemena, MSc.PT, is a Ph.D candidate in the College of Healthcare Sciences, James Cook University, Australia.

Udoka C. Okafor, Ph.D, is a senior lecturer in the Department of Physiotherapy, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Nigeria

Oluwatosin O. Ehuwa, B.PT, is a graduate physiotherapist from the Department of Physiotherapy, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Nigeria.

Chukwuebuka O. Okeke, MSc.PT, is a lecturer in the Department of Physiotherapy, Nnamdi Azikiwe University, Nigeria.

Oladuni C. Osundiya, Ph.D, is a lecturer in the Department of Physiotherapy, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Nigeria

Jeremiah P. Oyedemi, B.PT, is a graduate physiotherapist from the Department of Physiotherapy, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Nigeria

Chidinma J. Ezeugwa, MSc.PT, is a graduate assistant and also a Ph.D student in the Department of Physiotherapy, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Nigeria

Acknowledgements

Authors would like than appreciate all the students who voluntarily participated in this study. This research did not receive any specific grant from funding agencies in the public, commercial, or not-for-profit sectors.

Share

Submission Location

 
COinS
 
 

To view the content in your browser, please download Adobe Reader or, alternately,
you may Download the file to your hard drive.

NOTE: The latest versions of Adobe Reader do not support viewing PDF files within Firefox on Mac OS and if you are using a modern (Intel) Mac, there is no official plugin for viewing PDF files within the browser window.