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Abstract

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The purposes of this study were to explore the ability of doctor of physical therapy students to self-assess performance during a video-recorded practical examination, to evaluate student perceptions of the experience, and to determine their perception of their ability to self-assess. Method: A cross-sectional design with students from 2 consecutive cohorts was utilized. Participants worked in groups of three conducting a video-recorded gait training session. Students graded their own performance immediately upon completing the practical examination. Students then regraded their performance from the video recording. The instructor graded each student’s video-recorded performance using the same rubric as the students. Following the experience, students completed a 7-question survey administered via Survey Monkey. Data were analyzed using Friedman’s ANOVA with post-hoc Wilcoxon signed-rank test to compare median scores. Cohen’s Kappa and percent agreement calculations assessed inter- and intra-rater reliability. Student perception data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and non-parametric Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: The only significant difference in scores was between student-live and faculty examiner assessments for Cohort 2. Inter-rater reliability (.09-.17) and percent agreement (20.7%-26.3%) were low across all comparisons. Intra-rater reliability (.12-.23) and percent agreement (23.7%-34.5%) were also low for both cohorts. Students rated their ability to self-assess from the video-recorded performance significantly higher than from the live performance (pConclusions:Students’ ability to self-assess performance does not appear to be well developed in the early stages of physical therapy education. The use of video-recorded performance, in conjunction with instructor feedback, could enhance this ability, ideally leading to independent and effective self-assessment as students proceed through the curriculum.

Author Bio(s)

Ellen R. Perlow, PT, DPT, is a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Physical Therapy at Mercer University in Atlanta, Georgia. She is also a licensed physical therapist in the state of Georgia.

Niamh M. Tunney, PT, DPT, MS, is a clinical associate professor in the Department of Physical Therapy at Mercer University in Atlanta, Georgia. She is also a licensed physical therapist in the state of Georgia.

Jeffrey G. Ebert, PT, DPT, OCS, is a clinical assistant professor in the Department of Physical Therapy at Mercer University in Atlanta, Georgia. He is also a licensed physical therapist in the state of Georgia.

Acknowledgements

We would like to acknowledge the assistance of Dr. Alyssa Laforme Fiss, PT, PhD, PCS, with her assistance with statistical analysis.

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