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Abstract

Mapping serves as a metaphor for where we are now, where we have been, and where we are going. In this paper the authors illustrate the use of outcome mapping as a methodological framework for documenting the planning, monitoring, and evaluation process for the Métis Settlements Life Skills Journey (MSLSJ) project. The MSLSJ is a multi-year, multi-site, multi-method research project. It is centered on building relationships and facilitating knowledge exchange between the University of Alberta team, Métis Settlement Councils and administrators, and Settlement members. We highlight how the outcome mapping framework enables us to document project processes through the identification of key boundary partners and strategies in support of learning. Outcome mapping became a reflective and strategic tool for the MSLSJ project, reflecting on six years of data from seven sites, representing over 430 participants, and guiding the project forward.

Keywords

Outcome Mapping, Methodology, Boundary Partners, Métis

Author Bio(s)

Brent Hammer is a Qualitative Research Coordinator with the Métis Settlements Life Skills Journey Project in the Faculty of Extension at the University of Alberta, Canada. He has a PhD in Cultural Anthropology. Correspondence regarding this article can be addressed directly to: bhammer@ualberta.ca.

Alicia Hibbert is a Wellbeing Planning and Evaluation Advisor at the University of British Columbia, Canada. She has worked as an applied researcher since 2010 at the University of Alberta, working with First Nations and Métis communities to build resiliency among children and youth.

Fay Fletcher is a Professor with the Faculty of Extension at the University of Alberta, Canada. She has focused on the integration of research and teaching with the intent of making adult education more accessible, relevant, and meaningful for all learners.

Rebecca Shortt is a Research Coordinator with the Métis Settlements Life Skills Journey Project in the Faculty of Extension at the University of Alberta, Canada. She has an MA in Community Engagement with a focus on Indigenous/non-Indigenous relationship building.

Mandy MacRae is a Project Specialist with the Faculty of Extension at the University of Alberta, Canada. She has worked as an administrator supporting Indigenous education programs since 2014.

Acknowledgements

The authors acknowledge the contributions of: community advisers; MSLSJ program assistants, facilitators, and child participants; the guidance of Buffalo Lake, Fishing Lake, Kikino, Elizabeth, and Peavine Métis Settlement Councils and administrators; and funders Alberta Health Services, Alberta Human Services, PolicyWise, and the University of Alberta Faculty of Extension (University of Alberta).

Publication Date

4-5-2020

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

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