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Abstract

Successful management of a multi-site bilingual team-based grounded theory study requires overcoming key challenges associated with implementation of a large-scale, multi-faceted project. This article retrospectively reviews the methodological strategies employed during a multi-site bilingual team-based grounded theory study that investigated the professional adaptation experiences of migrant social workers in Canada. The article presents the strategies that the research team engaged to overcome numerous challenges and successfully work together across a variety of contexts and systems, including (a) provincial contexts, (b) languages, (c) university systems, (d) virtual spaces, and (e) epistemological perspectives. The findings highlight the importance of leadership and teamwork as central to successful project completion.

Keywords

Grounded Theory, Team-Based Research, Bilingual Research, Multi-Site Research

Author Bio(s)

Amy E. Fulton is a coordinator of MSW field education and sessional instructor at the University of Calgary, Faculty of Social Work. Correspondence regarding this article can be addressed directly to: aefulton@ucalgary.ca.

Annie Pullen Sansfaçon is associate professor at l’Université de Montréal, École de travail social. Correspondence regarding this article can also be addressed directly to: a.pullen.sansfacon@umontreal.ca.

Marion Brown is associate professor at Dalhousie University, School of Social Work. Correspondence regarding this article can also be addressed directly to: marion.brown@dal.ca.

John R. Graham is professor and director at The University of British Columbia, Okanagan Campus, School of Social Work. Correspondence regarding this article can also be addressed directly to: john.graham@ucalgary.ca.

Stéphanie Ethier is a doctoral student at l’Université de Montréal, École de travail social. Correspondence regarding this article can also be addressed directly to: stephanie.ethier@umontreal.ca.

Acknowledgements

The authors are grateful to the migrant social workers who participated in the study. They also wish to thank those who helped with the recruitment of participants, including the ACSW, NSASW, and the OTSTCFQ. The research presented in this article was funded by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada / Conseil de recherche en sciences humaines (SSHRC/CRSH Grant number 435-2012-0391).

Publication Date

11-20-2018

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

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