Presentation Title

Engaging all students: Integrating hands-on math activities and technology

Start

1-30-2019 10:30 AM

End

1-30-2019 11:45 AM

Short Description

Students struggling with math are present in every classroom regardless of socio-economic status or gender. To meet the needs of 21st-century learners, math teachers are encouraged to explore, and expand many possibilities of utilizing technologies to foster active student engagement. Today, while many students are reluctant to pursue careers in mathematics, others are inseparable from technology. Utilizing virtual tools and assistive technology allow students to learn and have fun as they explore different math concepts.

Abstract

The purpose of this presentation is to share with participants the importance of increasing the use of technology in math classrooms to meet the needs of twenty-first-century learners. Specifically, the presentation focuses on technologies used to assist struggling math students including students with a disability. Data shows deficiency in mathematics affects student test scores and overall academic achievement (Fuchs & Fuchs, 2008; Stanberry, 2016). Towards this end, educators have pushed to increase the use of technology in the classroom. Instructors of preservice teachers are encouraged to better prepare them to integrate and use technology. Although the use of technology have several benefits including an increase in student learning and engagement, research show that technology may not always be properly integrated into every day teaching (Moyer-Packenham & Suh, 2012). To help reduce or eliminate this deficiency, a key requirement is for teachers to implement the use of technology and to ensure that the technology utilized fosters active engagement. While the use of videos and Smartboards/interactive white boards have a place in the math classroom, increase in the use of iPods and iPads are more relevant as teachers seek for better ways to engage students (Oliver, Osa, & Walker, 2012). Using math content-specific apps and websites coupled with virtual manipulatives will provide opportunities for teachers to venture higher as they explore and increase their use of technology in the math classroom.

This presentation provides an opportunity for participants to engage in a hands-on experience with using the technology. Participants will i) view a demonstration of using at least one software, Fluid Math and ii) engage in using Sway-Microsoft Application and the talking calculator. The aim is to not only capture teacher-participants’ attention but for them through active engagement to make a connection with the software/application as they consider ways in which to improve their student math skills.

References:

Billings, E., & Mathison, C., (2011). I get to use an iPod in school? Using technology-based advance organizers to support the academic success of English Learners. Journal of Science Education Technology, (21), 494-503.

Chaman M.J., Beswick K., Callingham, R. (2014). Factors influencing Mathematics achievement among secondary school students. In: The Future of Educational Research. Bold Visions in Educational Research. Rotterdam: SensePublishers.

Moyer-Packenham, P.S., & Suh, J.M., (2012). Learning mathematics with technology: The influence of virtual manipulatives on different achievement groups. Journal of Computers in Mathematics and Science Teaching, 31(1), 39-59

Oliver, A., Osa, J.O., & Walker, T.M., (2012). Using instructional technologies to enhance teaching and learning for the 21st century preK-12 students. International Journal of Instructional Media, 39(4), 283-295.

Format

Concurrent Session

Institutional level targeted

K-12

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Jan 30th, 10:30 AM Jan 30th, 11:45 AM

Engaging all students: Integrating hands-on math activities and technology

The purpose of this presentation is to share with participants the importance of increasing the use of technology in math classrooms to meet the needs of twenty-first-century learners. Specifically, the presentation focuses on technologies used to assist struggling math students including students with a disability. Data shows deficiency in mathematics affects student test scores and overall academic achievement (Fuchs & Fuchs, 2008; Stanberry, 2016). Towards this end, educators have pushed to increase the use of technology in the classroom. Instructors of preservice teachers are encouraged to better prepare them to integrate and use technology. Although the use of technology have several benefits including an increase in student learning and engagement, research show that technology may not always be properly integrated into every day teaching (Moyer-Packenham & Suh, 2012). To help reduce or eliminate this deficiency, a key requirement is for teachers to implement the use of technology and to ensure that the technology utilized fosters active engagement. While the use of videos and Smartboards/interactive white boards have a place in the math classroom, increase in the use of iPods and iPads are more relevant as teachers seek for better ways to engage students (Oliver, Osa, & Walker, 2012). Using math content-specific apps and websites coupled with virtual manipulatives will provide opportunities for teachers to venture higher as they explore and increase their use of technology in the math classroom.

This presentation provides an opportunity for participants to engage in a hands-on experience with using the technology. Participants will i) view a demonstration of using at least one software, Fluid Math and ii) engage in using Sway-Microsoft Application and the talking calculator. The aim is to not only capture teacher-participants’ attention but for them through active engagement to make a connection with the software/application as they consider ways in which to improve their student math skills.

References:

Billings, E., & Mathison, C., (2011). I get to use an iPod in school? Using technology-based advance organizers to support the academic success of English Learners. Journal of Science Education Technology, (21), 494-503.

Chaman M.J., Beswick K., Callingham, R. (2014). Factors influencing Mathematics achievement among secondary school students. In: The Future of Educational Research. Bold Visions in Educational Research. Rotterdam: SensePublishers.

Moyer-Packenham, P.S., & Suh, J.M., (2012). Learning mathematics with technology: The influence of virtual manipulatives on different achievement groups. Journal of Computers in Mathematics and Science Teaching, 31(1), 39-59

Oliver, A., Osa, J.O., & Walker, T.M., (2012). Using instructional technologies to enhance teaching and learning for the 21st century preK-12 students. International Journal of Instructional Media, 39(4), 283-295.