Title

Using CRT to Understand Racial Microaggressions among Homeless Students of Color

Location

1047

Format Type

Event

Format Type

Paper

Start Date

January 2019

End Date

January 2019

Abstract

Despite the near-constant growth of homelessness among families and Children, almost three-quarters of which are Families and Children of Color, scholars have only twice employed a Critical Race Theory (CRT) of education to understand the educational experiences of Homeless Students of Color. Using a CRT framework and qualitative data, this study is the first to use racial microaggressions as tool to analyze the scholastic struggles of Homeless Students of Color in elementary, middle, and high school. This phenomenological study draws from 12 semi-structured in-depth interviews with Black and Latina/o homeless students between the ages of 12 and 18 living in Orange County, California. Results show how race, ethnicity, and homelessness generate unique forms of academic disempowerment for Homeless Youth of Color. Findings support the use of a race-conscious approach to address educational inequalities.

Keywords

Homelessness, Children and Youth, Urban Education, Critical Race Theory, Racial Microaggressions

Comments

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Using CRT to Understand Racial Microaggressions among Homeless Students of Color

1047

Despite the near-constant growth of homelessness among families and Children, almost three-quarters of which are Families and Children of Color, scholars have only twice employed a Critical Race Theory (CRT) of education to understand the educational experiences of Homeless Students of Color. Using a CRT framework and qualitative data, this study is the first to use racial microaggressions as tool to analyze the scholastic struggles of Homeless Students of Color in elementary, middle, and high school. This phenomenological study draws from 12 semi-structured in-depth interviews with Black and Latina/o homeless students between the ages of 12 and 18 living in Orange County, California. Results show how race, ethnicity, and homelessness generate unique forms of academic disempowerment for Homeless Youth of Color. Findings support the use of a race-conscious approach to address educational inequalities.