Title

Development of a focused, overarching qualitative research study question: Application of the EPPiC framework

Location

1047

Format Type

Event

Format Type

Paper

Start Date

January 2019

End Date

January 2019

Abstract

Introduction:Learning to independently conduct qualitative research is a challenge faced by many graduate students. A first step is the identification of a focused research topic. While there are many resources devoted to assisting novice researchers to accomplish this, we have found that turning an idea or clinical problem into a coherent research question remains a challenge to students enrolled in a graduate qualitative health research course. The aim of this project is to develop and test a user-friendly strategy for developing clearly articulated qualitative research questions.

Methods: Findings of a systematic literature search of CINAHL, PubMed, ERIC, and EMBASE uncovered limited guidance in actually structuring the question.

Findings: Acronyms (e.g. PS, SPIDER) were found that are useful in conducting literature searches to support evidence-based practice, but not useful for constructing a qualitative research question to guide a primary study.

Discussion:This presentation describes a new framework for structuring applied health qualitative research questions: EPPiC [E-Emphasis, P-Purposeful sample, Pi-Phenomena of interest, C-context]. Students are coached to construct their questions through considering each aspect of this framework. We will discuss our experiences in teaching using the EPPiC framework, considering feedback from teaching faculty and the students enrolled within the course.

Keywords

Qualitative, question development, study design

Comments

Breakout Session A

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Jan 16th, 11:30 AM Jan 16th, 11:50 AM

Development of a focused, overarching qualitative research study question: Application of the EPPiC framework

1047

Introduction:Learning to independently conduct qualitative research is a challenge faced by many graduate students. A first step is the identification of a focused research topic. While there are many resources devoted to assisting novice researchers to accomplish this, we have found that turning an idea or clinical problem into a coherent research question remains a challenge to students enrolled in a graduate qualitative health research course. The aim of this project is to develop and test a user-friendly strategy for developing clearly articulated qualitative research questions.

Methods: Findings of a systematic literature search of CINAHL, PubMed, ERIC, and EMBASE uncovered limited guidance in actually structuring the question.

Findings: Acronyms (e.g. PS, SPIDER) were found that are useful in conducting literature searches to support evidence-based practice, but not useful for constructing a qualitative research question to guide a primary study.

Discussion:This presentation describes a new framework for structuring applied health qualitative research questions: EPPiC [E-Emphasis, P-Purposeful sample, Pi-Phenomena of interest, C-context]. Students are coached to construct their questions through considering each aspect of this framework. We will discuss our experiences in teaching using the EPPiC framework, considering feedback from teaching faculty and the students enrolled within the course.