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Abstract

The researchers examined facilitators’ and parents’ experiences with the Positive Discipline in Everyday Parenting (PDEP) program through qualitative methodology. PDEP is a primary prevention program that teaches parents to move away from physical punishment and toward conflict resolution and positive parenting that focuses on stages of child development. Using a phenomenological approach, we conducted focus groups using semi-structured interviews with four PDEP facilitators and seven parents who completed the program. Parents and facilitators indicated that PDEP helped them learn new ways of thinking about parenting and contributed to overall changes in their parenting approach, including finding a balance of structured and sensitive parenting practices. Factors that contributed to positive experiences included the coherence and continuity among program modules, use of concrete examples to demonstrate concepts, supportive facilitators and fellow group members, and the provision of childcare. Suggestions for program improvement included the use of even more concrete examples to demonstrate parenting concepts, longer program duration, and greater flexibility in program delivery. These findings are important for further adaptations to the PDEP program. These findings may also be generalized to parenting programs that share similar core principles.

Keywords

Parenting, Intervention, Evaluation, Qualitative, Positive Discipline

Author Bio(s)

Lauren Stenason is a doctoral student in clinical psychology and part of the Children's Wellbeing Laboratory at the University of Ottawa. Correspondence regarding this article can be addressed directly to: lsten096@uottawa.ca.

Jessie Moorman is also a doctoral student in clinical psychology and part of the Children's Wellbeing Laboratory at the University of Ottawa. Correspondence regarding this article can also be addressed directly to: jmoor095@uottawa.ca.

Dr. Elisa Romano, is the research supervisor and director of the Children’s Wellbeing Laboratory at the University of Ottawa. She received her Ph.D. in clinical psychology from the University of Manitoba and is currently a full professor at the University of Ottawa. Her research interests focus on promoting the mental health and wellbeing of children and youth for those who have experienced child maltreatment and family violence. Correspondence regarding this article can also be addressed directly to: eromano@uottawa.ca.

Acknowledgements

This work was supported through a contract with a local community agency that received Ontario Trillium Funding to implement the PDEP program and gather outcome data.

Publication Date

1-6-2020

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

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