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Abstract

In this study, participants acquired three types of language, those are regional, national and foreign ones. The purpose of this research was to explore how Indonesian polyglots acquire several different languages. We collected data through demographic questionnaires and semi-structured interviews obtained from nine participants. Four salient themes and sub-themes that emerged in this research were (a) mastering languages through instructed learning (learning in formal educational institution and learning in informal educational institution), (b) gaining extra amounts of languages input beyond the classroom (getting more access to a national language environment and getting more access to foreign languages environment), (c) learning languages autonomously (self-directed learning through printed resources and self-directed learning through media and technology), and (d) acculturating with a new language group in society. The findings indicated that the polyglots acquired several different languages through a natural process, a learning process, and a mixture of both naturalistic as well as instructed experiences.

Keywords

Polyglots, Languages, Acquisition, Learning, Phenomenological Study

Author Bio(s)

Noprival, S.Pd, M.A TESL is a doctoral student in the Department of Language Education at Universitas Negeri Jakarta (State University of Jakarta), Jakarta, Indonesia. He received a Master of Teaching English as a Second Language from The English and Foreign Languages University, Hyderabad, India. He did his bachelor’s degree in English Language Teaching at English Department, Jambi University, Jambi, Indonesia. His research interests are in the area of second language acquisition, multilingualism, and English for specific purposes. Correspondence regarding this article can be addressed directly to: noprival@gmail.com; noprival@yahoo.com.

Prof. Zainal Rafli is a professor in the Department of Language Education, Universitas Negeri Jakarta (State University of Jakarta), Jakarta, Indonesia. His research interests include second language acquisition, psycholinguistics, and multilingualism. Correspondence regarding this article can also be addressed directly to: zainal.rafli@gmail.com.

Dr. Nuruddin is an associate professor in the Department of Language Education, Univeristas Negeri Jakarta (State University of Jakarta), Jakarta, Indonesia. He focuses on qualitative research in language education. Correspondence regarding this article can also be addressed directly to: nuruddin.unj@unj.ac.id.

Acknowledgements

In conducting this research, we were financially supported by Lembaga Pengelola Dana Pendidikan (Indonesia Endowment Fund for Education), Ministry of Finance of the Republic of Indonesia.

Publication Date

11-22-2019

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

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