Presentation Title

“Never at heart’s ease:” Perceptions of identity and radicalization amongst second- generation Pakistani-Canadians

Start Date

10-2-2021 1:45 PM

End Date

10-2-2021 2:45 PM

Proposal Type

Poster

Proposal Description

“Never at heart’s ease:” Perceptions of identity and radicalization amongst second-

generation Pakistani-Canadians

Abstract

This paper explores the crucial role of second-generation young Pakistanis-Canadians in contributing towards long term and sustainable peacebuilding, both at the domestic and at the international level. Using a qualitative research design, the paper gives voice to the lived experiences of a diverse body of second-generation Canadians and their views on diverge subjects such as their unique ethno-religious identity, radicalization to violence and ways to achieve sustainable peace.

The key findings that emerge from this research include that the participants had a fragmented identity and were confused whether their core identity is Canadian or revolves around their Muslim-Pakistani background. They felt strongly that structures favoring the dominant majority have relegated them to second-graded citizens and that white privilege is also a trigger towards radicalization to violence. Participants also perceived that radicalization was a multi-faceted phenomenon that transcends the socioeconomic divide and is exacerbated by the role of the media as well as exogenous factors including the Saudi policy of exporting its version of Salafi Islam to Canada.

This study is critical in informing policymakers about the necessity to incorporate the views of second-generation Pakistani-Canadian in order to frame holistic counter radicalization programs based on the voices of the grassroots within Muslim communities so that at-risk youth are saved from radicalization and those having fallen prey to radicalization may be successfully re-integrated into the Canadian polity

Keywords: Identity, National Security, Pakistani-Canadians, Peacebuilding, Second-generation immigrants, Radicalization, Terrorism.

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Feb 10th, 1:45 PM Feb 10th, 2:45 PM

“Never at heart’s ease:” Perceptions of identity and radicalization amongst second- generation Pakistani-Canadians

“Never at heart’s ease:” Perceptions of identity and radicalization amongst second-

generation Pakistani-Canadians

Abstract

This paper explores the crucial role of second-generation young Pakistanis-Canadians in contributing towards long term and sustainable peacebuilding, both at the domestic and at the international level. Using a qualitative research design, the paper gives voice to the lived experiences of a diverse body of second-generation Canadians and their views on diverge subjects such as their unique ethno-religious identity, radicalization to violence and ways to achieve sustainable peace.

The key findings that emerge from this research include that the participants had a fragmented identity and were confused whether their core identity is Canadian or revolves around their Muslim-Pakistani background. They felt strongly that structures favoring the dominant majority have relegated them to second-graded citizens and that white privilege is also a trigger towards radicalization to violence. Participants also perceived that radicalization was a multi-faceted phenomenon that transcends the socioeconomic divide and is exacerbated by the role of the media as well as exogenous factors including the Saudi policy of exporting its version of Salafi Islam to Canada.

This study is critical in informing policymakers about the necessity to incorporate the views of second-generation Pakistani-Canadian in order to frame holistic counter radicalization programs based on the voices of the grassroots within Muslim communities so that at-risk youth are saved from radicalization and those having fallen prey to radicalization may be successfully re-integrated into the Canadian polity

Keywords: Identity, National Security, Pakistani-Canadians, Peacebuilding, Second-generation immigrants, Radicalization, Terrorism.