Presentation Title

Critical and Emancipatory Peacebuilding and Ethnopolitical Conflicts

Start Date

10-2-2021 2:15 PM

End Date

10-2-2021 2:45 PM

Proposal Type

Panel

Proposal Description

As a legacy of colonialism, ethnic chauvinist leaders led virulent chauvinistic ethnonationalist movements within a segmented cultural milieu to manufacture boundaries amongst ethnic groups and intensify polarization, competition, and violence (Anastasiou, 2010; Sandole, 2003). The recent re-emergence and escalation of protracted ethnopolitical conflicts in places like Kordofan and Darfur-South Sudan, Molo and Mount Elgon-Kenya, West Papua-Indonesia, Kivu-DRC, Ossetian-Georgia, Republika Srpska-Bosnia-Herzegovina, Kurds-Turkey and Syria, Oromos and Somalis-Ethiopia, Kashmir-India and Pakistan, Catalonia-Spain, Houthis-Yemen, the Crimea-Ukraine, Israel and Palestine, Cyprus, the Sahel, Afghanistan, Roningya-Myanmar, Indigenous peoples and ethnic refugees in North America and Europe, and Biharis-Bangladesh, among others, remain major threats to international peace and security. The urgency and complexity of these conflicts have brought increased interest in exploring the issues anew within critical and emancipatory peacebuilding. Analyzing these conflicts and resolving them tend to move along separate paths. Consequently, this panel explores the role of economic aid, ethnographies of peacebuilding, civil society and digital space, measurements of positive peace, and UN intervention in critical peace and emancipatory peacebuilding. This panel is part of a series of chapters in the forthcoming Handbook of Peacebuilding and Ethnic Conflict.

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Feb 10th, 2:15 PM Feb 10th, 2:45 PM

Critical and Emancipatory Peacebuilding and Ethnopolitical Conflicts

As a legacy of colonialism, ethnic chauvinist leaders led virulent chauvinistic ethnonationalist movements within a segmented cultural milieu to manufacture boundaries amongst ethnic groups and intensify polarization, competition, and violence (Anastasiou, 2010; Sandole, 2003). The recent re-emergence and escalation of protracted ethnopolitical conflicts in places like Kordofan and Darfur-South Sudan, Molo and Mount Elgon-Kenya, West Papua-Indonesia, Kivu-DRC, Ossetian-Georgia, Republika Srpska-Bosnia-Herzegovina, Kurds-Turkey and Syria, Oromos and Somalis-Ethiopia, Kashmir-India and Pakistan, Catalonia-Spain, Houthis-Yemen, the Crimea-Ukraine, Israel and Palestine, Cyprus, the Sahel, Afghanistan, Roningya-Myanmar, Indigenous peoples and ethnic refugees in North America and Europe, and Biharis-Bangladesh, among others, remain major threats to international peace and security. The urgency and complexity of these conflicts have brought increased interest in exploring the issues anew within critical and emancipatory peacebuilding. Analyzing these conflicts and resolving them tend to move along separate paths. Consequently, this panel explores the role of economic aid, ethnographies of peacebuilding, civil society and digital space, measurements of positive peace, and UN intervention in critical peace and emancipatory peacebuilding. This panel is part of a series of chapters in the forthcoming Handbook of Peacebuilding and Ethnic Conflict.