Presentation Title

Promoting Equity in Secondary Mathematics Through Co-Teaching and Co-Planning

Start

1-31-2019 10:15 AM

End

1-31-2019 11:30 AM

Short Description

In this session we will present specific co-teaching and co-planning strategies as pedagogical practices that promote collaboration and communication between preservice teachers and mentor secondary mathematics teachers. Through these co-teaching and co-planning strategies we strive to promote equity in secondary mathematics.

Abstract

In this session, we will present our research on co-teaching and co-planning strategies as practices that promote collaboration and communication between preservice teachers and mentor secondary mathematics teachers. Through these strategies we strive to promote equity in secondary mathematics. The intended audience is mathematics teachers and teacher educators. The presentation will be presented as a concurrent presentation.

Co-teaching has been used successfully in the special education context for a number of years. Its success has led to an interest in its use in student teaching settings. We sought to use improvement science research design to integrate co-teaching into field experiences, as a means to increase equitable learning opportunities in secondary mathematics (Bryk, Gomez, Grunow, & LeMahieu, 2015; Sears et al., 2017).

Our research explores the use of co-teaching and co-planning in the secondary mathematics setting. Preservice teachers are introduced as teachers from the onset and are encouraged to be active participants in the planning and implementation of the enacted lessons with guidance from their collaborative teachers (Bacharch, Heck, & Dahlberg, 2010).

Co-teaching strategies include: one teach one assists, station teaching, parallel teaching, one teach one observe, alternative teaching, and team teaching (Bacharach, Heck, & Dahlberg, 2010; Murawski & Spencer, 2011). Researchers have found that these co-teaching strategies increased opportunities for professional growth for the instructional pairs (collaborative teachers and preservice teachers), and positively impacted students’ academic performances.

Secondary mathematics co-teaching teams also used a variety of these co-planning strategies and found co-planning helpful and rewarding (Grady, Sears, Stone & Biagetti).. Researchers discovered that co-planning is essential to co-teaching and, often, one of the largest challenges to successful implementation of co-teaching. Murawski and Lochner (2011) state that “Without co-planning, teachers are at best working together in a parallel or reactive manner” (p.175). Co-planning strategies include: One plans, one assists, partner planning, One reflects one plans, one plans, one reacts, parallel planning, team planning (Grady et al).

According to The Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators (AMTE) position statement on equity (2015), equity is defined as “access to high quality learning experiences; inclusion for all learners, mathematics educators, and mathematics teacher educators; and respectful and fair engagement with others”. Towards that end, co-teaching and co-planning strategies are pedagogical practices that ultimately promote student engagement in learning mathematics in an environment that embraces diversity and promotes equity.

Format

Concurrent Session

Institutional level targeted

K-12

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Jan 31st, 10:15 AM Jan 31st, 11:30 AM

Promoting Equity in Secondary Mathematics Through Co-Teaching and Co-Planning

In this session, we will present our research on co-teaching and co-planning strategies as practices that promote collaboration and communication between preservice teachers and mentor secondary mathematics teachers. Through these strategies we strive to promote equity in secondary mathematics. The intended audience is mathematics teachers and teacher educators. The presentation will be presented as a concurrent presentation.

Co-teaching has been used successfully in the special education context for a number of years. Its success has led to an interest in its use in student teaching settings. We sought to use improvement science research design to integrate co-teaching into field experiences, as a means to increase equitable learning opportunities in secondary mathematics (Bryk, Gomez, Grunow, & LeMahieu, 2015; Sears et al., 2017).

Our research explores the use of co-teaching and co-planning in the secondary mathematics setting. Preservice teachers are introduced as teachers from the onset and are encouraged to be active participants in the planning and implementation of the enacted lessons with guidance from their collaborative teachers (Bacharch, Heck, & Dahlberg, 2010).

Co-teaching strategies include: one teach one assists, station teaching, parallel teaching, one teach one observe, alternative teaching, and team teaching (Bacharach, Heck, & Dahlberg, 2010; Murawski & Spencer, 2011). Researchers have found that these co-teaching strategies increased opportunities for professional growth for the instructional pairs (collaborative teachers and preservice teachers), and positively impacted students’ academic performances.

Secondary mathematics co-teaching teams also used a variety of these co-planning strategies and found co-planning helpful and rewarding (Grady, Sears, Stone & Biagetti).. Researchers discovered that co-planning is essential to co-teaching and, often, one of the largest challenges to successful implementation of co-teaching. Murawski and Lochner (2011) state that “Without co-planning, teachers are at best working together in a parallel or reactive manner” (p.175). Co-planning strategies include: One plans, one assists, partner planning, One reflects one plans, one plans, one reacts, parallel planning, team planning (Grady et al).

According to The Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators (AMTE) position statement on equity (2015), equity is defined as “access to high quality learning experiences; inclusion for all learners, mathematics educators, and mathematics teacher educators; and respectful and fair engagement with others”. Towards that end, co-teaching and co-planning strategies are pedagogical practices that ultimately promote student engagement in learning mathematics in an environment that embraces diversity and promotes equity.