Title

Study of Experiencing a Sense of Community at St. Agnes Soup Kitchen

Location

3034

Format Type

Paper

Format Type

Paper

Start Date

January 2016

End Date

January 2016

Abstract

This qualitative study reports on how volunteers experience a sense of community at the St. Agnes Soup Kitchen and identifies communities of practices as social structures through which roles and shared identity are developed and reinforced (Wenger, McDermott, & Snyder, 2002). Members apply communal knowledge in the context of a case scenario that presents a crisis situation in the soup kitchen. Through story-telling, and conversation, multiple world views and diverse perspectives are sought, challenged and reshaped; knowledge serves as a conduit, breathing life throughout the community.

Community norms, rules and their impact on member identity are additional factors contributing to a sense of community. This is demonstrated in terms of how members welcome new comers to the community and view key symbolic ritualistic components of group identification. Members of the soup kitchen community of practice are also members of multiple groups in which they play overlapping roles in the context of dynamic relationships that support the community framework. The soup kitchen’s supervisor and active core group of experts support the community. Role expectations must work in concert with member’s social identity.

Suggestions for future research directions are explored giving further insight into achieving common ground, accountability and a sense of identity in complex and overlapping relationships.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Jan 15th, 2:10 PM Jan 15th, 2:30 PM

Study of Experiencing a Sense of Community at St. Agnes Soup Kitchen

3034

This qualitative study reports on how volunteers experience a sense of community at the St. Agnes Soup Kitchen and identifies communities of practices as social structures through which roles and shared identity are developed and reinforced (Wenger, McDermott, & Snyder, 2002). Members apply communal knowledge in the context of a case scenario that presents a crisis situation in the soup kitchen. Through story-telling, and conversation, multiple world views and diverse perspectives are sought, challenged and reshaped; knowledge serves as a conduit, breathing life throughout the community.

Community norms, rules and their impact on member identity are additional factors contributing to a sense of community. This is demonstrated in terms of how members welcome new comers to the community and view key symbolic ritualistic components of group identification. Members of the soup kitchen community of practice are also members of multiple groups in which they play overlapping roles in the context of dynamic relationships that support the community framework. The soup kitchen’s supervisor and active core group of experts support the community. Role expectations must work in concert with member’s social identity.

Suggestions for future research directions are explored giving further insight into achieving common ground, accountability and a sense of identity in complex and overlapping relationships.