Title

Documentary investigation of the cultural competence exhibited at an African American weekly newspaper organization

Location

2072

Format Type

Paper

Format Type

Panel

Start Date

14-1-2017 10:30 AM

End Date

14-1-2017 11:50 AM

Abstract

How does cultural competence propagate within a minority organization (Georgetown University, 2016)? For many in these identity-based organizations, this may be the only establishment where they feel their leadership style is represented equitably. Robert Cole, a prominent social theory researcher, used a qualitative personal documentary style to investigate how people see themselves within their communities and their lives (Fricke, 2006). Since little is known about African American newspaper editors' and publishers' perceptions of their community presence and leadership styles, I employed the documentary style to observe an African American weekly newspaper editor-in-chief for whom I reported to 25 years ago. How do minorities in entrepreneurial organizations view their own identity? What degree of this perception is conveyed fairly and equitably in the community they serve? This snapshot is one example of cultural competence an African American editor-in-chief showed that did not work well at the community level, but did so internally. This conclusion noted a series of risks leading to increased newspaper circulation among many demographics. The leadership style used at this minority-own newspaper was categorized as charismatic, potentiating, and transpersonal leadership (McCaslin, 2008; 2015). In further analysis, this leadership style led to a community social change example (Dugan, 2006; Higher Education Research Institute, 1996).

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Jan 14th, 10:30 AM Jan 14th, 11:50 AM

Documentary investigation of the cultural competence exhibited at an African American weekly newspaper organization

2072

How does cultural competence propagate within a minority organization (Georgetown University, 2016)? For many in these identity-based organizations, this may be the only establishment where they feel their leadership style is represented equitably. Robert Cole, a prominent social theory researcher, used a qualitative personal documentary style to investigate how people see themselves within their communities and their lives (Fricke, 2006). Since little is known about African American newspaper editors' and publishers' perceptions of their community presence and leadership styles, I employed the documentary style to observe an African American weekly newspaper editor-in-chief for whom I reported to 25 years ago. How do minorities in entrepreneurial organizations view their own identity? What degree of this perception is conveyed fairly and equitably in the community they serve? This snapshot is one example of cultural competence an African American editor-in-chief showed that did not work well at the community level, but did so internally. This conclusion noted a series of risks leading to increased newspaper circulation among many demographics. The leadership style used at this minority-own newspaper was categorized as charismatic, potentiating, and transpersonal leadership (McCaslin, 2008; 2015). In further analysis, this leadership style led to a community social change example (Dugan, 2006; Higher Education Research Institute, 1996).