Title

Evenings at the Parent Meetings: Migrant Farmworker Parents Talk About Education in Their Young Children's Lives

Location

3035

Format Type

Paper

Format Type

Paper

Start Date

13-1-2017 3:40 PM

End Date

13-1-2017 5:00 PM

Abstract

The ethnographic study highlights data from three case studies of migrant farmworker families of Mexican-origin with young children attending Migrant and Seasonal Head Start (MSHS) programs in the Upper Midwestern region of the United States. The cases are part of a larger study that included 14 migrant farmworker parents. The cases highlight the encounters and the discussions with the heads of household for each of these families, exemplifying the voices of two fathers and one grandmother. The cases are supplemented with field notes, other interviews, observations from migrant farmworker labor camps, and parent meetings at the preschools and historical notes on the region. The findings will share the influence of identity, social relationships, and life experiences that contribute to how migrant farmworker parents construct roles in their children’s education.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Jan 13th, 3:40 PM Jan 13th, 5:00 PM

Evenings at the Parent Meetings: Migrant Farmworker Parents Talk About Education in Their Young Children's Lives

3035

The ethnographic study highlights data from three case studies of migrant farmworker families of Mexican-origin with young children attending Migrant and Seasonal Head Start (MSHS) programs in the Upper Midwestern region of the United States. The cases are part of a larger study that included 14 migrant farmworker parents. The cases highlight the encounters and the discussions with the heads of household for each of these families, exemplifying the voices of two fathers and one grandmother. The cases are supplemented with field notes, other interviews, observations from migrant farmworker labor camps, and parent meetings at the preschools and historical notes on the region. The findings will share the influence of identity, social relationships, and life experiences that contribute to how migrant farmworker parents construct roles in their children’s education.