Title

“I Thought It Was Cool How We Were Part of Research”: Youth as Co-Researchers

Location

1049

Format Type

Paper

Format Type

Paper

Start Date

12-1-2017 1:15 PM

End Date

12-1-2017 3:05 PM

Abstract

Despite children’s travel to many destinations worldwide, tourism research focuses almost exclusively on adult travelers. Overlooking young tourists effectively silences their voices and ignores their experiences. To address this oversight, we identified multiple data generation tools and methods to enable youth to document their experiences without impeding their excursions. We then joined 59 eighth grade students who were traveling to Washington, DC and invited them to generate five forms of data. With iPads, they produced photographs, audio recordings and typed text. They also created handwritten journals and participated in audio-recorded interviews. Without altering their itinerary, participating students generated over 500 photographs, 300 comments, and joined in a total of over 100 interviews. Data collection occurred across several settings throughout each day, including tour buses, indoor and outdoor destinations, and a hotel. Students chose multiple tools to collect their data. They also identified barriers, modified data collection tools, and recommended new research designs. Their participation illustrates the value of engaging youth as full partners in travel research. We believe our experiences will benefit others hoping to co-research with children, especially in out-of-school settings.

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Jan 12th, 1:15 PM Jan 12th, 3:05 PM

“I Thought It Was Cool How We Were Part of Research”: Youth as Co-Researchers

1049

Despite children’s travel to many destinations worldwide, tourism research focuses almost exclusively on adult travelers. Overlooking young tourists effectively silences their voices and ignores their experiences. To address this oversight, we identified multiple data generation tools and methods to enable youth to document their experiences without impeding their excursions. We then joined 59 eighth grade students who were traveling to Washington, DC and invited them to generate five forms of data. With iPads, they produced photographs, audio recordings and typed text. They also created handwritten journals and participated in audio-recorded interviews. Without altering their itinerary, participating students generated over 500 photographs, 300 comments, and joined in a total of over 100 interviews. Data collection occurred across several settings throughout each day, including tour buses, indoor and outdoor destinations, and a hotel. Students chose multiple tools to collect their data. They also identified barriers, modified data collection tools, and recommended new research designs. Their participation illustrates the value of engaging youth as full partners in travel research. We believe our experiences will benefit others hoping to co-research with children, especially in out-of-school settings.