Title

Stories of School Yoga: Teaching, Learning and Doing Narrative Inquiry as Editor-Mentor-Advocates

Location

1049

Format Type

Event

Format Type

Paper

Start Date

January 2019

End Date

January 2019

Abstract

In this narrative inquiry project, two teacher educators, both teachers and practitioners of qualitative research, acted as editor-mentor-advocates for/with public school-based yoga teachers, whose work had not been recognized as contributing to “what we know” by the almost exclusively quantitative/traditional researchers in our specific field, yoga in schools.

Showcasing our contributors’ narratives, we utilized a format that carries multiple voices through two distinct languages: one academic, one practical. Our inspiration came from Lather and Smithies (1997), who disrupted traditional ideas about scholarly books being written in the language of analysis. By relegating our critical-academic commentary to chapter codas, we attempted to get out of the way of those who do the actual teaching of yoga in schools.

Here, we reflect on our project goals, the process of working with each other, and the use of narrative to explore the current work of yoga in schools. We describe our learning as it emerged from working with our contributors, and dialogue about how our different epistemological orientations created some tensions in how we saw our roles as editors and respondents. Finally, we explicate some key themes from the collection of narratives, and also note what we read as absent or left unsaid.

Lather, P. & Smithies, C. (1997). Troubling the angels: Women living with HIV/AIDS. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.

Keywords

yoga in schools, narrative inquiry, feminist

Comments

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Stories of School Yoga: Teaching, Learning and Doing Narrative Inquiry as Editor-Mentor-Advocates

1049

In this narrative inquiry project, two teacher educators, both teachers and practitioners of qualitative research, acted as editor-mentor-advocates for/with public school-based yoga teachers, whose work had not been recognized as contributing to “what we know” by the almost exclusively quantitative/traditional researchers in our specific field, yoga in schools.

Showcasing our contributors’ narratives, we utilized a format that carries multiple voices through two distinct languages: one academic, one practical. Our inspiration came from Lather and Smithies (1997), who disrupted traditional ideas about scholarly books being written in the language of analysis. By relegating our critical-academic commentary to chapter codas, we attempted to get out of the way of those who do the actual teaching of yoga in schools.

Here, we reflect on our project goals, the process of working with each other, and the use of narrative to explore the current work of yoga in schools. We describe our learning as it emerged from working with our contributors, and dialogue about how our different epistemological orientations created some tensions in how we saw our roles as editors and respondents. Finally, we explicate some key themes from the collection of narratives, and also note what we read as absent or left unsaid.

Lather, P. & Smithies, C. (1997). Troubling the angels: Women living with HIV/AIDS. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.