Title of Project

Adhesion of Transferrin to FDA Group IV Contact Lenses

Researcher Information

Edward O. Keith

Project Type

Event

Location

Alvin Sherman Library 4009

Start Date

2-4-2004 12:00 AM

End Date

2-4-2004 12:00 AM

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Apr 2nd, 12:00 AM Apr 2nd, 12:00 AM

Adhesion of Transferrin to FDA Group IV Contact Lenses

Alvin Sherman Library 4009

Contact lenses are widely used as a replacement for eyeglasses to correct vision. The adhesion of tear proteins to contact lenses contributes to lens deterioration, and may lead to vision problems and ocular pathology. Tears contain a large number of proteins, among them being lysozyme, albumin, transferrin, lactoferrin, immunoglobulins and tear lipocalin. Here we report studies of the adhesion of transferrin to FDA group IV (high water ionic polymer) contact lenses. Lenses were incubated in a solution of transferrin for 1, 2, 3, and 4 days, and transferrin adhesion was determined using the bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assay. Transferrin adsorbed to the Group IV lenses to a significant degree after one day, and then remained elevated for the remainder of the experimental period. This pattern of adhesion resembled the pattern seen with lysozyme and albumin. In contrast, the adhesion of transferrin to Group I lenses (low water non-ionic polymer) resembled the pattern seen with albumin, but did not resemble the pattern seen with lysozyme. Average transferrin adhesion to all Group IV lenses was 116 ug/lens (± 43), as compared to 92 (± 6) for lysozyme and 49 (± 4) for albumin.