Date of Award

2018

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD)

Department

College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences – Department of Conflict Resolution Studies

First Advisor

Ismael Muvingi

Second Advisor

Thomas Matyok

Third Advisor

Jason Campbell

Abstract

This qualitative research case study explored the indigenous model of conflict resolution known as the “Judiyya,” in the South Darfur State, Sudan. The purpose of the study has been to understand the principles and practices of the Judiyya in maintaining peace among Darfuri tribal communities. Judiyya is a community-based, human-centered model that employs restorative and transformative principles in conflict resolution. The literature review provided context for a research project that addressed the following questions: What is the role of the Judiyya in the current situation? How does the model work? What are its decision-making processes? How does the Judiyya model relate to the International Human Rights Standards? The primary data sources include face-to-face interviews, researcher observations, and a review of document collections and archival records. Research findings explore five emergent themes: Religion or belief system, Elderly leadership, Trust, Effectiveness, and Legitimacy. These explain the model’s process and practices and offer to policymakers some new ideas and perspectives about how to understand and use the indigenous model, which is evaluated for strengths and challenges. The model remains relevant and continues to thrive around the greater Darfur area, helping tribal communities maintain harmony, coexistence, and peace. This research contributes to the emerging literature about the relevance of endogenous knowledge and indigenous models of conflict resolution, and the ongoing efforts to better understand the cultural context of conflict and its reconciliation process.

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