Event Title

Stakeholder's Perceptions of Needs, Abilities, and Quality of Life of Individuals with Severe and Persistent Mental Illness

Event Type

Presentation

Start Date

11-12-2016 9:30 AM

End Date

11-12-2016 10:00 AM

Description

This qualitative phenomenological study is the first of a three-part study exploring the perceptions of staff and clients in mental health services regarding the needs, abilities, and quality of life of individuals with severe and persistent mental illness, and whether the perspectives of these two groups were congruent or dissimilar. The study sample consisted of six clients and six staff members from a mental health program in Central Florida. The thematic analysis of the interviews revealed five themes that represent the staff and clients’ perceptions of clients’ needs, skills, abilities, and quality of life. The results highlight the need for client- centered, occupation-based, recovery- oriented approaches that can lead to occupational competence and occupational identity and warrants further investigation into the benefits of occupational therapy with clients with severe and persistent mental illness.

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Dec 11th, 9:30 AM Dec 11th, 10:00 AM

Stakeholder's Perceptions of Needs, Abilities, and Quality of Life of Individuals with Severe and Persistent Mental Illness

This qualitative phenomenological study is the first of a three-part study exploring the perceptions of staff and clients in mental health services regarding the needs, abilities, and quality of life of individuals with severe and persistent mental illness, and whether the perspectives of these two groups were congruent or dissimilar. The study sample consisted of six clients and six staff members from a mental health program in Central Florida. The thematic analysis of the interviews revealed five themes that represent the staff and clients’ perceptions of clients’ needs, skills, abilities, and quality of life. The results highlight the need for client- centered, occupation-based, recovery- oriented approaches that can lead to occupational competence and occupational identity and warrants further investigation into the benefits of occupational therapy with clients with severe and persistent mental illness.