Event Title

Updating the International Symbol of Access: A Social Representation Perspective

Event Type

Presentation

Start Date

11-12-2016 10:15 AM

End Date

11-12-2016 10:45 AM

Description

One of the most recognizable symbols is the International Symbol of Access (ISA) (Ben-Moshe, L & Powell, 2007), which can be seen to demarcate public places such as accessible parking spaces and public lavatories. However, recently an Accessible Icon Project introduced a new modified accessibility symbol (Chokshi, 2014). This study aims to explore the social representations (e.g. shared meanings, beliefs) of the original and new modified ISA symbol and how these social representations are shared by individuals with and without physical disabilities. Fourteen participants enrolled in this study and each completed an in-depth interview, in addition to a free word association test and Likert-scale questionnaire regarding their perceptions of both the original and new modified accessibility symbol. The results of this study show that both the original and modified accessibility symbols evoke specific meanings regarding how disability may be viewed within society. Furthermore, this study concludes that the original accessibility symbol is preferred over the modified accessibility symbol to globally represent disability within society.

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Dec 11th, 10:15 AM Dec 11th, 10:45 AM

Updating the International Symbol of Access: A Social Representation Perspective

One of the most recognizable symbols is the International Symbol of Access (ISA) (Ben-Moshe, L & Powell, 2007), which can be seen to demarcate public places such as accessible parking spaces and public lavatories. However, recently an Accessible Icon Project introduced a new modified accessibility symbol (Chokshi, 2014). This study aims to explore the social representations (e.g. shared meanings, beliefs) of the original and new modified ISA symbol and how these social representations are shared by individuals with and without physical disabilities. Fourteen participants enrolled in this study and each completed an in-depth interview, in addition to a free word association test and Likert-scale questionnaire regarding their perceptions of both the original and new modified accessibility symbol. The results of this study show that both the original and modified accessibility symbols evoke specific meanings regarding how disability may be viewed within society. Furthermore, this study concludes that the original accessibility symbol is preferred over the modified accessibility symbol to globally represent disability within society.