College of Psychology: Faculty Articles

Title

Maltreatment in Psychiatrically Hospitalized Children and Adolescents with Developmental Disabilities: Prevalence and Correlates

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

5-1994

Keywords

Child Maltreatment, Developmental Disability, Inpatients

Publication Title

Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

ISSN

0890-8567

Volume

33

Issue/No.

4

Abstract

Objective

The goals of this study were (1) to determine the prevalence of child maltreatment in hospitalized children and adolescents with developmental disabilities and concomitant psychiatric disorders, and (2) to identify the contribution of specific mother and child characteristics to the use of more severe disciplinary practices by mothers.

Method

One hundred thirty-eight psychiatrically hospitalized children and adolescents with developmental disabilities and mothers were assessed using a semistructured interview (Child Abuse and Neglect Interview Schedule) examining factors associated with risk of child maltreatment, and questionnaires measuring maternal and child functioning. The Child Abuse and Neglect Interview Schedule and hospital charts were then used to derive ratings on the prevalence and severity of child maltreatment.

Results

Findings revealed that 61% of children had experienced some form of severe maltreatment by a care provider in their lifetime. Regression analysis indicated that interactions between high levels of social functioning and disruptive/oppositional behaviors and younger age in children, and low levels of social support and increased anger reactivity in mothers, were most predictive of mothers' use of severe disciplinary practices.

Conclusions

Maltreatment in psychiatrically hospitalized children and adolescents with disabilities is very prevalent, and it warrants careful clinical assessment. In the psychiatric setting, families in which the child is younger, higher functioning, and behaviorally disruptive, and where mothers have little social support and exhibit increased anger reactivity, are at especially elevated risk.

DOI

10.1097/00004583-199405000-00015

Peer Reviewed

Find in your library

Share

COinS