College of Psychology: Faculty Articles

Title

Insomnia And The Eye Of The Beholder: Are There Clinical Markers Of Objective Sleep Disturbances Among Adults With And Without Insomnia Complaints?

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

8-2000

Keywords

Attitude to Health, Case-Control Studies, Middle Aged, Psychological Models, Polysomnography, Psychiatric Status Rating Scales, Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders

Publication Title

Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology

ISSN

0022-006X

Volume

68

Issue/No.

4

Abstract

Previous findings suggest that some who report insomnia sleep well, whereas some noncomplaining individuals sleep rather poorly. This study was conducted to determine if mood, anxiety, and sleep-related beliefs might relate to perceived sleep disturbance. Thirty-two women and 32 men (aged 40–79 years) with primary insomnia and an aged-matched sample of 61 normal sleepers (31 women, 30 men) completed 6 nocturnal sleep recordings, as well as the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), the Trait portion of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-2), and the Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes About Sleep Questionnaire. Sleep and interview data were used to subdivide the majority of the sample (n = 108) into objective normal sleepers and subjective insomnia sufferers who seemingly slept well and subjective normal sleepers and objective insomnia sufferers who slept poorly. The 2 subjective subgroups showed the most marked differences on most of the psychometric measures. The findings suggest that the psychological factors scrutinized in this study may mediate sleep satisfaction and/or predict objective sleep difficulties

DOI

10.1037/0022-006X.68.4.586

Peer Reviewed

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