Faculty Articles

Title

Towards a Better Understanding of PTSD/Hypertension Associations: Examining Sociodemographic Aspects

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

3-21-2021

Publication Title

Hearts

ISSN or ISBN

2673-3846

Volume

2

Issue/Number

1

Abstract/Excerpt

The present study is an examination of sociodemographic and environmental correlates of hypertension and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), with the goal of better understanding previously identified PTSD and hypertension associations. Data from 5877 adults up to age 54 were analyzed to examine racial and ethnic differences in hypertension, and relationships of socioeconomic status (SES; total family income), employment status, and marital status, and urbanicity (urban, suburban, or rural habitation) with hypertension and PTSD. Next, a total model was tested to determine which sociodemographic and environmental variables, and/or PTSD were significant independent correlates of hypertension. Higher rates of hypertension were evident among African Americans (13.8%), relative to Caucasian (7.7%) or Hispanic (6.7%) participants (p < 0.001). Low SES (family income under USD 19,000) and unemployment were associated with significantly greater likelihood (p < 0.001) of hypertension (9.8% vs. 7.6% for low SES; 14.3% vs. 8.3% for unemployment) and PTSD (16.6% vs. 8.7% for low SES; 21.3% vs. 9.6% for unemployment). Participants who were married versus those separated or divorced were significantly less likely (p < 0.001) to have hypertension (9.0% vs. 11.9%) or PTSD (10.8% vs. 18.3%). Urbanicity was not significantly associated with hypertension or PTSD. Unemployment and PTSD were the only significant independent factors associated with hypertension.

DOI

10.3390/hearts2010012

Peer Reviewed

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