Faculty Articles

Title

Acculturation Styles and Their Associations with Psychiatric Symptoms and Quality of Life in Ethnic Minorities with Schizophrenia

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

9-1-2017

Keywords

acculturation, adult, african continental ancestry group, brief psychiatric rating scale, female, hispanic americans, humans, male, minority groups, quality of life, schizophrenia, schizophrenic psychology, self concept, social identification

Publication Title

Psychiatry research

ISSN

1872-7123

Volume

255

Abstract

This study examined whether Berry's model of acculturative stress would predict psychiatric symptom severity and quality of life (QoL) in ethnic minorities with schizophrenia. Tested extensively in non-psychiatric populations, Berry's framework generally suggests that integration, or engagement with both the host and minority culture, is most adaptive. Using the Abbreviated Multidimensional Acculturation Scale (AMAS), we tested the hypothesis that individuals with schizophrenia who employed an integrative acculturation strategy would have the highest QoL and lowest symptom severity, followed by the assimilation and enculturation groups, then the marginalized group. Psychiatric symptoms and QoL were regressed on AMAS assimilation scores, enculturation scores, and the interaction term in a sample of 128 Hispanic and Blacks with schizophrenia (M age = 41.28; 70% male). Acculturation strategy was not found to relate to psychiatric symptoms (measured from the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale). However, acculturation strategy did predict QoL (measured from the Quality of Life Inventory), and results were in line with Berry's model. Marginalization may exacerbate issues surrounding social identity in schizophrenia, including low self-concept clarity and internalized stigma. Encouraging bicultural individuals with schizophrenia to interact with the host culture while also practicing traditions from their minority culture may help improve their quality of life.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.psychres.2017.06.074

PubMed ID

28672225

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