Title

Good teachers for good researchers

Location

2101/2102

Format Type

Paper

Format Type

Paper

Start Date

January 2016

End Date

January 2016

Abstract

In the area of social research, it is not uncommon to come across qualitative interviews (transcribed or recorded) that present conduction strategies which seem to be in contrast to that is recommended and indicated by a greater part of literature on this subject.

In order to understand the reason why this occurs, I want to present the results of a research carried out among Italian sociologists who use qualitative interviews for their research.

My research aimed to identify by which criteria qualitative interviews are conducted by researchers and in what ways the relationship with the narrator is regarded. I tried to establish a connection between the conduction strategies used by researchers, their training and their attitudes towards the narrators.

I found three different conducting styles, and divided my interviewees into three categories, that I have named as follows: second choice qualitative interviewers, qualitative-quantitative interviewers and authentic qualitative interviewers. Only one of these categories presents a real positive attitude towards the interviewees.

The problem is: all these researchers also teach qualitative methods at university or train new interviewers for their research. So, what kind of future researchers are they training?

If we want to have good researchers tomorrow, we have to be good teachers right now.

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Jan 14th, 2:15 PM Jan 14th, 2:35 PM

Good teachers for good researchers

2101/2102

In the area of social research, it is not uncommon to come across qualitative interviews (transcribed or recorded) that present conduction strategies which seem to be in contrast to that is recommended and indicated by a greater part of literature on this subject.

In order to understand the reason why this occurs, I want to present the results of a research carried out among Italian sociologists who use qualitative interviews for their research.

My research aimed to identify by which criteria qualitative interviews are conducted by researchers and in what ways the relationship with the narrator is regarded. I tried to establish a connection between the conduction strategies used by researchers, their training and their attitudes towards the narrators.

I found three different conducting styles, and divided my interviewees into three categories, that I have named as follows: second choice qualitative interviewers, qualitative-quantitative interviewers and authentic qualitative interviewers. Only one of these categories presents a real positive attitude towards the interviewees.

The problem is: all these researchers also teach qualitative methods at university or train new interviewers for their research. So, what kind of future researchers are they training?

If we want to have good researchers tomorrow, we have to be good teachers right now.