College of Psychology: Faculty Articles

Title

Comparison of Alcoholics’ Self-Reports of Drinking Behavior with Reports of Collateral Informants

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

2-1979

Keywords

Alcohol Drinking, Alcoholism, Epidemiologic Methods, Follow-Up Studies, Hospitalization, Interpersonal Relations, Middle Aged, Self-Assessment

Publication Title

Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology

ISSN

0022-006X

Volume

47

Issue/No.

1

Abstract

Six-month posthospitalization follow-up data were collected from 52 alcoholic subjects and their collateral informants. Subjects' self-reports and collateral reports of subjects' drinking were highly correlated when subjects had been either mostly abstinent or mostly drunk throughout the follow-up period. When subject and collateral reports differed, there was no systematic direction of difference in number of abstinent days, but subjects reported fewer drunk days and more limited-drinking, hospitalization, and jail days than did their collaterals. Number of days that collaterals were in contact with subjects during the follow-up period was not strongly related to the amount of discrepancy between subject and collateral reports. These findings suggest that (a) alcoholics who have been hospitalized for detoxification generally provide reliable self-reports of their posttreatment drinking behavior, and (b) gathering data from collateral informants is an effective method for corroborating alcoholics' self-reports of drinking behavior.

Additional Comments

This publication was abstracted in:

Psychiatry Digest, 1979.

DOI

10.1037/0022-006X.47.1.106

ResearchID/ORCID ID

0000-0001-7705-3993