Location

Desantis Atrium

Event Website

https://seaphages.org

Start Date

26-10-2022 11:30 AM

End Date

26-10-2022 1:00 AM

Description

Research opportunity targeted for freshmen and sophomores through the SEA-PHAGES program. The goal of the research is to discover new bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria) to help combat antibiotic resistance. Phage therapy is a promising alternative to conventional antibiotics. Phages have also been widely used in the food industry to prevent microbial growth on certain foods and are currently being explored as a method for bioremediation of oil spills and wastewater treatment.

Last year, my research team discovered two new bacteriophages: Genamy16 and NovaSharks that were able to infect the bacteria Gordonia rubripertincta. These phages can possibly be used for bioremediation and have been included in the SEA-PHAGES database, the National Library of Medicine (NIH), and have been approved for manuscript publication.

This research spans two semesters and can be found in the course catalog as BIOL 1000 (the first part of the course, offered in the Fall semester) and BIOL 1001 (the second part of the course, offered in the Winter semester).

The research experience provided by these courses is extremely valuable. Students gain real, translatable microbiology, molecular biology, genomics, and bioinformatics skills. As hinted at earlier, there is also the opportunity for students to become published co-authors as well as present at research conferences and symposiums.

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Oct 26th, 11:30 AM Oct 26th, 1:00 AM

SEA-PHAGES Research Opportunity

Desantis Atrium

Research opportunity targeted for freshmen and sophomores through the SEA-PHAGES program. The goal of the research is to discover new bacteriophages (viruses that infect bacteria) to help combat antibiotic resistance. Phage therapy is a promising alternative to conventional antibiotics. Phages have also been widely used in the food industry to prevent microbial growth on certain foods and are currently being explored as a method for bioremediation of oil spills and wastewater treatment.

Last year, my research team discovered two new bacteriophages: Genamy16 and NovaSharks that were able to infect the bacteria Gordonia rubripertincta. These phages can possibly be used for bioremediation and have been included in the SEA-PHAGES database, the National Library of Medicine (NIH), and have been approved for manuscript publication.

This research spans two semesters and can be found in the course catalog as BIOL 1000 (the first part of the course, offered in the Fall semester) and BIOL 1001 (the second part of the course, offered in the Winter semester).

The research experience provided by these courses is extremely valuable. Students gain real, translatable microbiology, molecular biology, genomics, and bioinformatics skills. As hinted at earlier, there is also the opportunity for students to become published co-authors as well as present at research conferences and symposiums.

https://nsuworks.nova.edu/trick/2022/events/9