Title of Project

Synthesis of New Ruthenium (II) Complex with a Long Excited State Lifetime for Its Use as a DNA Probing Biosensor

Researcher Information

Terry-Ann Dawes

Project Type

Event

Start Date

7-4-2006 12:00 AM

End Date

7-4-2006 12:00 AM

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Apr 7th, 12:00 AM Apr 7th, 12:00 AM

Synthesis of New Ruthenium (II) Complex with a Long Excited State Lifetime for Its Use as a DNA Probing Biosensor

Due to the degree of instrumentation needed for DNA diagnostic procedures, it has become considerably expensive for the public and independent laboratories to conduct research on genetic diseases and to probe DNA. Even though myriad technologies are available for detection and measurement of modified target molecules, DNA probing techniques are involved and complex processes. To remedy the problem, researchers have developed methods of molecular binding detection by using fluorometric assays because they are more sensitive than colormetric ones. However, these have proved to be inefficient because of complications due to background fluorescence and light scattering. Additionally, current methods of chemiluminescence by metal-ligand complexes (such as those with ruthenium) are ineffective because luminescent lifetimes are extremely short. The proposed project will examine metal-to-ligand charge transfer in DNA with the use of novel ruthenium-ligand complexes with enhanced emission lifetimes. DNA will react favorably with these complexes because it has excellent electron conducting capabilities and provides a ‘circuit’ through which electrons from the complex may flow. So, because the new ruthenium-ligand complexes will be synthesized to have an enhanced emission lifetime, intercalation with DNA will be more easily observed with the naked eye without the use of extensive instrumentation. Such interactions between DNA and the complexes will allow various reactions and modes of binding to be observed during the design and development of new drugs, synthetic restriction enzymes, DNA footprinting, and DNA diagnostics.