CAHSS Faculty Articles

Department

Department of Writing and Communication

Publication Date

3-2020

Publication Title

WLN: A Journal of Writing Center Scholarship

Volume

44

Issue/No.

7-8

First Page

10

Last Page

17

Abstract

Course-embedded peer-to-peer writing support programs, also referred to as “writing fellows” programs, are often discussed in terms of student mentoring, writing growth, and advocacy. For example, Jim Henry et al. examine course-embedded mentoring in first-year composition (FYC) courses; Kevin Dvorak et al. study ways embedded tutoring helps students achieve FYC course learning outcomes; and Dara Rossman Regaignon and Pam Bromley find that “working with the writing fellows multiple times over the course of the semester results in a positive and measurable difference in students’ writing” (48). Bradley Hughes and Emily Hall see course-embedded programs as a form of student advocacy, as well. Despite these and other studies, less attention has been paid to how course-embedded consultants (CECs) and faculty perceive the benefits of such programming to students and to themselves as major stakeholders. Furthermore, most studies of CEC work have been limited in terms of scope to individual classes, programs, or institutions.

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