Authors

Fernanda Coelho de Souza, University of Leeds - United Kingdom
Kyle G. Dexter, University of Edinburgh - United Kingdom; Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh - United Kingdom
Oliver L. Phillips, University of Leeds - United Kingdom
Roel J. W. Brienen, University of Leeds - United Kingdom
Jerome Chave, Universite Paul Sabatier - Toulouse, France
David Galbraith, University of Leeds - United Kingdom
Gabriela Lopez Gonzalez, University of Leeds - United Kingdom
Abel Monteagudo M., Jardın Botanico de Missouri - Oxapampa, Peru; Universidad Nacional de San Antonio Abad del Cusco - Peru
R. Toby Pennington, Royal Botanic Garden Edingburgh - United Kingdom
Lourens Poorter, Wageningen University - The Netherlands
Miguel Alexiades, University of Kent - United Kingdom
Esteban Alvarez Davila, Fundacion Con Vida - Medellin, Colombia
Ana Andrade, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia - Manaus, Brazil
Luiz E. O. C. Aragao, University of Exeter - United Kingdom; Brazilian National Institute for Space Research
Alejandro Araujo-Murakami, Universidad Autonoma Gabriel Rene Moreno - Santa Cruz, Bolivia
Eric Arets, Wageningen University - The Netherlands
Gerardo A. Aymard C., UNELLEZ-Guanare - Venezuela
Christopher Baraloto, Florida International University
Jorcely Barroso, Universidade Federal do Acre - Rio Branco, Brazil
Damien Bonal, INRA - France
Rene G. A. Boot, Tropenbos International - Wageningen, The Netherlands
Jose Luis C. Camargo, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia - Manaus, Brazil
James A. Comiskey, United States National Park Service; Smithsonian Institution
Fernando Cornejo Valverde, Proyecto Castana - Madre de Dios, Peru
Plinio Barbosa de Camargo, Universidade de Sao Paulo - Brazil
Anthony Di Fiore, University of Texas at Austin
Fernando Elias, Universidade do Estado de Mato Grosso - Brazil
Terry L. Erwin, Smithsonian Institution
Ted R. Feldpausch, University of Exeter - United Kingdom
Leandro Ferreira, Museu Paraense Emilio Goeldi - Belem, Brazil
Nikolaos M. Fyllas, University of Leeds - United Kingdom
Manuel Gloor, University of Leeds - United Kingdom
Bruno Herault, CIRAD - France
Rafael Herrera, Centro de Ecologia IVIC - Venezuela; University of Vienna - Austria
Niro Higuchi, INPA - Manaus, Brazil
Euridice N. Honorio Coronado, Instituto de Investigaciones de la Amazonia Peruana - Iquitos, Peru
Timothy Killeen, AGTECA - Santa Cruz, Bolivia
William F. Laurance, James Cook University - Cairns, Australia
Susan G. W. Laurance, James Cook University - Cairns, Australia
Jon Lloyd, Imperial College London - United Kingdom
Thomas E. Lovejoy, George Mason University
Yadvinder Malhi, University of Oxford - United Kingdom
Leandro Maracahipes, Universidade Federal de Goias - Brazil
Beatriz S. Marimon, Universidade do Estado de Mato Grosso - Nova Xavantina, Brazil
Ben-Hur Marimon Jr., Universidade do Estado de Mato Grosso - Nova Xavantina, Brazil
Casimiro Mendoza, Universidad Mayor de San Simon - Sacta, Bolivia
Paulo S. Morandi, Universidade do Estado de Mato Grosso - Nova Xavantina, Brazil
David Neill, Universidad Estatal Amazonica - Puyo, Ecuador
Percy Nunez Vargas, Universidad Nacional de San Antonio Abad del Cusco - Peru
Edmar A. Oliveira, Universidade do Estado de Mato Grosso - Nova Xavantina, Brazil
Eddie Lenza, Universidade do Estado de Mato Grosso - Nova Xavantina, Brazil
Walter Palacios, Universidad Tecnica del Norte and Herbario Nacional del Ecuador - Quito
Maria C. Penuela-Mora, Universidad Regional Amazonica IKIAM - Ecuador
John J. Pipoly III, Broward County Parks & Recreation DivisionFollow
Nigel C. A. Pitman, Duke University
Adriana Prieto, Universidad Nacional de Colombia - Bogota
Carlos A. Quesada, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazonia - Manaus, Brazil
Hirma Ramirez-Angulo, Universidad de Los Andes - Merida, Venezuela
Agustin Rudas, Universidad Nacional de Colombia - Bogota
Kalle Ruokolainen, University of Turku - Finland
Rafael P. Salomao, Museu Paraense Emilio Goeldi - Belem, Brazil
Marcos Silveira, Universidade Federal do Acre - Rio Branco, Brazil
Juliana Stropp, Federal University of Alagoas - Brazil
Hans ter Steege, Naturalis Biodiversity Centre - The Netherlands
Raquel Thomas, Iwokrama International Centre for Rainforest Conservation and Development - Riberalta, Bolivia
Peter van der Hout, Van der Hout Forestry Consulting - The Netherlands
Geertje van der Heijden, University of Nottingham - United Kingdom
Peter J. van der Meer, Van Hall Larenstein University of Applied Sciences - The Netherlands
Rodolfo V. Vasquez, Jardin Botanico de Missouri - Oxapampa, Peru
Simone A. Vieira, Universidade Estadual de Campinas - Brazil
Emilio Vilanova, Universidad de Los Andes - Merida, Venezuela
Vincent A. Vos, Universidad Autonama del Beni - Riberalta, Bolivia; Centro de Investigacion y Promocion del Campesinado Norte Amazanico - Riberalta, Bolivia
Ophelia Wang, Northern Arizona University
Kenneth R. Young, University of Texas at Austin
Roderick J. Zagt, Tropenbos International - Wageningen, The Netherlands

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

12-14-2016

Publication Title

Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences

Keywords

Tropical tree, Trait, Convergent evolution, Divergent selection, Phylogenetic signal

ISSN

0962-8452

Volume

283

Issue/No.

1844

First Page

1

Last Page

9

Abstract

Lineages tend to retain ecological characteristics of their ancestors through time. However, for some traits, selection during evolutionary history may have also played a role in determining trait values. To address the relative importance of these processes requires large-scale quantification of traits and evolutionary relationships among species. The Amazonian tree flora comprises a high diversity of angiosperm lineages and species with widely differing life-history characteristics, providing an excellent system to investigate the combined influences of evolutionary heritage and selection in determining trait variation. We used trait data related to the major axes of life-history variation among tropical trees (e.g. growth and mortality rates) from 577 inventory plots in closed-canopy forest, mapped onto a phylogenetic hypothesis spanning more than 300 genera including all major angiosperm clades to test for evolutionary constraints on traits. We found significant phylogenetic signal (PS) for all traits, consistent with evolutionarily related genera having more similar characteristics than expected by chance. Although there is also evidence for repeated evolution of pioneer and shade tolerant life-history strategies within independent lineages, the existence of significant PS allows clearer predictions of the links between evolutionary diversity, ecosystem function and the response of tropical forests to global change.

Comments

©2016 The Authors. Published by the Royal Society under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/, which permits unrestricted use, provided the original author and source are credited.

Additional Comments

European Union’s Seventh Framework Programme project #s: 283080 ‘GEOCARBON’, and 282664, ‘AMAZALERT’; Natural Environment Research Council grant #: ‘AMAZONICA’ (NE/F005806/1), ‘TROBIT’ (NE/D005590/1), ‘Niche Evolution of South American Trees’ (NE/I028122/1); CNPq project #: PELD-403725/2012-7; Coordination for the Improvement of Higher Education Personnel - Brasil grant #: 117913-6; Leverhulme Trust Research Fellowship #: RF-2015-653

ORCID ID

0000-0002-7977-9496

ResearcherID

C-6533-2012

DOI

10.1098/rspb.2016.1587

Peer Reviewed

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