Marine & Environmental Sciences Faculty Articles

Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-19-2020

Publication Title

International Journal of Remote Sensing

ISSN

0143-1161

Volume

41

Issue/No.

10

First Page

3886

Last Page

3901

Abstract

The sea surface microlayer (SML) is the upper 1 mm of the ocean, where Earth’s biogeochemical processes occur between the ocean and atmosphere. It is physicochemically distinct from the water below and highly variable in space and time due to changing physical conditions. Some microorganisms influence the composition of the SML by producing surfactants for biological functions that accumulate on the surface, decrease surface tension, and create slicks. Slicks can be visible to the eye and in synthetic aperture radar (SAR) satellite imagery. This study focuses on surfactant-associated bacteria in the near-surface layer and their role in slick formation where oil is present.

Comments

© 2020 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Additional Comments

This research was made possible by a grant from the Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative to Consortium for Advanced Research on Transport of Hydrocarbon in the Environment (CARTHE) and an Office of Naval Research Award N00014-18-1-2835.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

ORCID ID

0000-0003-3848-1690, 0000-0002-2743-3602, 0000-0001-6519-1547, 0000-0001-7017-6835

ResearcherID

G-4080-2013

DOI

10.1080/01431161.2019.1708508

Peer Reviewed

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