Event Title

Reaction-Diffusion-Delay Model for Chondrocyte/Cytokine Interactions During Typical Injury Response in Articular Cartilage

Description

Mechanical or chemical stress to cartilage kills chondrocytes (i.e., cartilage cells) resulting in the development of lesions on the cartilage surface. The typical injury response often causes collateral damage, which results in the spread of these lesions beyond the region of initial injury. This increases the chances of development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis. A balancing act between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines determines the amount of collateral damage that occurs and suggests possible therapies for limiting such damage. In this talk, Graham will discuss his work that aims to develop a mathematical representation for the interactions of such cytokines and the resulting effects on the cartilage cell population, which may be used to investigate the spread or abatement of post-injury cartilage damage.

Presenter Bio

Jason Graham teaches at University of Iowa

Date of Event

March 14, 2012 12 - 1:00 PM

Location

Mailman-Hollywood Building, Room 310, 3301 College Ave., Fort Lauderdale (main campus)

NSU News Release Link

http://nsunews.nova.edu/upcoming-mathematics-colloquium-talks-discuss-math-research-cartilage-viruses/

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Mar 14th, 12:00 PM Mar 14th, 1:00 PM

Reaction-Diffusion-Delay Model for Chondrocyte/Cytokine Interactions During Typical Injury Response in Articular Cartilage

Mailman-Hollywood Building, Room 310, 3301 College Ave., Fort Lauderdale (main campus)

Mechanical or chemical stress to cartilage kills chondrocytes (i.e., cartilage cells) resulting in the development of lesions on the cartilage surface. The typical injury response often causes collateral damage, which results in the spread of these lesions beyond the region of initial injury. This increases the chances of development of post-traumatic osteoarthritis. A balancing act between pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines determines the amount of collateral damage that occurs and suggests possible therapies for limiting such damage. In this talk, Graham will discuss his work that aims to develop a mathematical representation for the interactions of such cytokines and the resulting effects on the cartilage cell population, which may be used to investigate the spread or abatement of post-injury cartilage damage.

https://nsuworks.nova.edu/mathematics_colloquium/ay_2011-2012/events/7