Event Title

Mathematical Modeling of Within-Host Virus Dynamics Under Periodic Combination Drug Therapy

Description

Modeling within-host virus dynamics has been a popular research topic in the mathematical biology community over the past two decades, especially in the case of HIV. A mathematical model can help scientists gain a greater understanding of virus-host interactions. In this talk, Browne will discuss the dynamical consequences of incorporating combination drug therapy in a classical within-host virus model. The combination therapy consists of two different types of antiviral medication, both of which have time-periodic efficacy functions. Using perturbation techniques and Floquet theory, Browne will argue that the timing between dosages of the two different drugs can critically affect the virus dynamics. Moreover, he will support the theoretical findings with numerical simulations. Understanding the optimal timing of drug dosages may aid in designing anti-HIV treatment strategies and motivates interesting mathematical and biological questions for future research.

Presenter Bio

Cameron Browne has a Ph.D. and teaches at University of Florida

Date of Event

March 15, 2012 12 - 1:00 PM

Location

Mailman-Hollywood Building, Room 311, 3301 College Ave., Fort Lauderdale (main campus)

NSU News Release Link

http://nsunews.nova.edu/upcoming-mathematics-colloquium-talk-discusses-math-research-viruses/

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Mar 15th, 12:00 PM Mar 15th, 1:00 PM

Mathematical Modeling of Within-Host Virus Dynamics Under Periodic Combination Drug Therapy

Mailman-Hollywood Building, Room 311, 3301 College Ave., Fort Lauderdale (main campus)

Modeling within-host virus dynamics has been a popular research topic in the mathematical biology community over the past two decades, especially in the case of HIV. A mathematical model can help scientists gain a greater understanding of virus-host interactions. In this talk, Browne will discuss the dynamical consequences of incorporating combination drug therapy in a classical within-host virus model. The combination therapy consists of two different types of antiviral medication, both of which have time-periodic efficacy functions. Using perturbation techniques and Floquet theory, Browne will argue that the timing between dosages of the two different drugs can critically affect the virus dynamics. Moreover, he will support the theoretical findings with numerical simulations. Understanding the optimal timing of drug dosages may aid in designing anti-HIV treatment strategies and motivates interesting mathematical and biological questions for future research.

http://nsuworks.nova.edu/mathematics_colloquium/ay_2011-2012/events/6