Event Title

America’s Idol? How the Contestant Most Voted for Doesn’t Always Win

Description

The reality television show American Idol is a hit among audiences, with each weekly episode drawing millions of viewers. Its popularity stems in part because of viewer participation. Viewers are given an opportunity to “vote” for their favorite singers each season, eventually crowning a new idol. However, there are some biases in the show’s format, which display themselves in data charts and curves of contestants’ telephone voting patterns.

In this lecture, Gershman will examine bias such as issues of geography and performance order. The data used is intriguing because it comes from an extremely biased sample but leads to an unbiased population estimate. Overall, this is a fascinating-and somewhat counterintuitive-problem in applied probability and queuing theory.

Presenter Bio

Jason Gershman has a Ph.D. and is an Assistant Professor/Coordinator of Mathematics at Nova Southeastern University

Date of Event

November 4, 2009 12 - 1:00 PM

Location

Mailman-Hollywood Building, Room 310, 3301 College Ave., Fort Lauderdale (main campus)

NSU News Release Link

http://nsunews.nova.edu/americas-idol-how-the-contestant-most-voted-for-doesnt-always-win/

Share

COinS
 
Nov 4th, 12:00 PM Nov 4th, 1:00 PM

America’s Idol? How the Contestant Most Voted for Doesn’t Always Win

Mailman-Hollywood Building, Room 310, 3301 College Ave., Fort Lauderdale (main campus)

The reality television show American Idol is a hit among audiences, with each weekly episode drawing millions of viewers. Its popularity stems in part because of viewer participation. Viewers are given an opportunity to “vote” for their favorite singers each season, eventually crowning a new idol. However, there are some biases in the show’s format, which display themselves in data charts and curves of contestants’ telephone voting patterns.

In this lecture, Gershman will examine bias such as issues of geography and performance order. The data used is intriguing because it comes from an extremely biased sample but leads to an unbiased population estimate. Overall, this is a fascinating-and somewhat counterintuitive-problem in applied probability and queuing theory.

https://nsuworks.nova.edu/mathematics_colloquium/ay_2009-2010/events/6