Presentation Title

COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy: A Real-World Survey

Presenter Credentials

Genevieve M. Hale, PharmD, BCPS, BCCP, CPh, College of Pharmacy, Associate Professor

Presenter Degree

PharmD

Co-Author Credentials

Huy Pham, PharmD, College of Pharmacy, PGY2 Ambulatory Care Pharmacy Resident

College

College of Pharmacy

Campus Location

Palm Beach

Format

Poster

IRB Approval Verification

Yes

Abstract

Purpose/Objective: To identify concerns that lead to COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy. Background/Rationale: Despite efforts to produce safe and highly effective COVID-19 vaccines, overcoming the current pandemic can only be accomplished if people are willing to receive this preventive therapy. Unfortunately, many are hesitant to receive a vaccination. Methods/Methodology: An original survey was disseminated via emailed link or QR code on flyer in September and October 2021. Inclusion criteria were adults at or older than 18 years who can read in English and have access to a computer or smartphone. Results/Findings: In a cross-sectional study of 79 participants, 11.4% were not vaccinated. Of these, the majority (88.6%) either was a little concerned or not concerned at all contracting COVID-19 and passing it to family or friends. 44.4% were not planning to get vaccinated in the future and another 44.4% were undecided. Most personally knew someone who had become seriously ill or died from COVID-19 (66.7%), were healthcare workers (55.6%), were very unlikely to be vaccinated if offered a fully FDA approved COVID-19 vaccine at no cost (44.4%). The top reasons for not receiving a COVID-19 vaccine to date were concerns about long-term effects of the COVID-19 vaccines, knowing someone who had a bad reaction to a COVID-19 vaccine, and not believing there is currently enough data to make an informed decision. Conclusions: There is a lack of confidence and misinformation regarding COVID-19 vaccinations. Interprofessional Implications: Healthcare workers hesitancy in receiving the COVID-19 vaccine poses an additional complication for achieving high COVID-19 vaccination rates. References (AMA): Ratzan S, Schneider EC, Hatch H, et al. Missing the point - how primary care can overcome COVID-19 vaccine "hesitancy." N Engl J Med 2021;384:e100.

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COVID-19 Vaccine Hesitancy: A Real-World Survey

Purpose/Objective: To identify concerns that lead to COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy. Background/Rationale: Despite efforts to produce safe and highly effective COVID-19 vaccines, overcoming the current pandemic can only be accomplished if people are willing to receive this preventive therapy. Unfortunately, many are hesitant to receive a vaccination. Methods/Methodology: An original survey was disseminated via emailed link or QR code on flyer in September and October 2021. Inclusion criteria were adults at or older than 18 years who can read in English and have access to a computer or smartphone. Results/Findings: In a cross-sectional study of 79 participants, 11.4% were not vaccinated. Of these, the majority (88.6%) either was a little concerned or not concerned at all contracting COVID-19 and passing it to family or friends. 44.4% were not planning to get vaccinated in the future and another 44.4% were undecided. Most personally knew someone who had become seriously ill or died from COVID-19 (66.7%), were healthcare workers (55.6%), were very unlikely to be vaccinated if offered a fully FDA approved COVID-19 vaccine at no cost (44.4%). The top reasons for not receiving a COVID-19 vaccine to date were concerns about long-term effects of the COVID-19 vaccines, knowing someone who had a bad reaction to a COVID-19 vaccine, and not believing there is currently enough data to make an informed decision. Conclusions: There is a lack of confidence and misinformation regarding COVID-19 vaccinations. Interprofessional Implications: Healthcare workers hesitancy in receiving the COVID-19 vaccine poses an additional complication for achieving high COVID-19 vaccination rates. References (AMA): Ratzan S, Schneider EC, Hatch H, et al. Missing the point - how primary care can overcome COVID-19 vaccine "hesitancy." N Engl J Med 2021;384:e100.