Presentation Title

An Interprofessional Education Student Experience in Aural Rehabilitation: Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology

Presenter Credentials

Erin Beasley, M.S., CCC-SLP, Clinical Supervisor/Program Instructor Nannette Nicholson, Ph.D., CCC-AUD, Professor

Presenter Degree

CCC-SLP

Co-Author Credentials

CCC-AUD

College

Dr. Pallavi Patel College of Health Care Sciences

Campus Location

Ft. Lauderdale

Format

Poster

IRB Approval Verification

Yes

Abstract

Purpose The purpose was to develop, implement, and evaluate an aural rehabilitation (AR) support group incorporating the Interprofessional Collaborative Practice Core Competencies (2016) for students in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology. Background Research suggests AR support group participants benefit from informational and personal adjustment counseling coupled with auditory and visual perceptual training (Boothroyd, 2007; Preminger et al., 2010). This presents an opportunity for Interprofessional education (IPE), which occurs when students from two or more professions learn about, from, and with each other (WHO, 2010). IPE competencies for graduate audiology and SLP students are included in the standards (CAA, 2016). IPE experiences embedded in the learning environments are advantageous to students, faculty members, and patients (Lumague, et al., 2006). Method An IPE AR group was planned titled “Hearing Loss Strategies for Success” delivered via Zoom. Planning and debriefing meetings were held with students throughout the semester. Twelve AUD and 11 SLP students have participated in the AR program over four semesters. A student Canvas site was developed and loaded with resource materials (IDA Institute, 2020). Results Communication, collaboration, roles and responsibilities, and teamwork were assessed. Pre- and post-session ICCAS scores were presented. Results for ICCAS and self-rated skills were provided. Conclusions Conducting AR sessions via Zoom was more beneficial than in-person sessions (e.g., easier access, reached more people, participation of significant others). Group AR via Zoom allowed more students to participate than would have otherwise been possible. Students need very explicit written expectations about working within the IPE framework. Debriefing following each session and written reflections were instrumental in improving performance in subsequent sessions. IPE Implications We conducted qualitative assessments of the students and participants. The main questions were “What went well, what didn’t go well, and what can we change to make it better next time?” The Interprofessional Collaborative Competency Attainment Survey (ICCAS) was used as a pre/post measure. Modified ICCAS administration after the first session reinforces the expectations regarding interprofessional collaboration (students also complete it after the last session). Students completed self-perception rating of twenty relevant skills.

References Council on Academic Accreditation (2016). 2017 Standards for accreditation. Available from http://caa.asha.org/reporting/standards/2017-standards/. Boothroyd, A. (2007). Adult aural rehabilitation: what is it and does it work?. Trends in Amplification, 11(2), 63–71. https://doi.org/10.1177/1084713807301073 IDA Institute (2020). Group Aural Rehabilitation. IDA Institute https://idainstitute.com/tools/group_ar/ Lumague, M., Morgan, A., Mak, D., Hanna, M., Kwong, J., Cameron, C., Zener, D. & Sinclair, L. (2006) Interprofessional education: The student perspective, Journal of Interprofessional Care, 20:3, 246-253. https://doi.org/10.1080/13561820600717891. Preminger J, & Yoo J. (2010) Do group audiologic rehabilitation activities influence psychosocial outcomes? Amer J Audiol 19(2): 109–125. https://doi.org/10.1044/1059-0889(2010/09-0027) World Health Organization (WHO, 2002). Framework for action on interprofessional education And Collaborative practice. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization. Available from https://www.who.int/hrh/resources/framework_action/en/

Selection Criteria

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Poster IPE Student Experience 2.9.22 Corrected.pptx (4732 kB)
IPE: Aural Rehab SLP and Audiology

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An Interprofessional Education Student Experience in Aural Rehabilitation: Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology

Purpose The purpose was to develop, implement, and evaluate an aural rehabilitation (AR) support group incorporating the Interprofessional Collaborative Practice Core Competencies (2016) for students in Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology. Background Research suggests AR support group participants benefit from informational and personal adjustment counseling coupled with auditory and visual perceptual training (Boothroyd, 2007; Preminger et al., 2010). This presents an opportunity for Interprofessional education (IPE), which occurs when students from two or more professions learn about, from, and with each other (WHO, 2010). IPE competencies for graduate audiology and SLP students are included in the standards (CAA, 2016). IPE experiences embedded in the learning environments are advantageous to students, faculty members, and patients (Lumague, et al., 2006). Method An IPE AR group was planned titled “Hearing Loss Strategies for Success” delivered via Zoom. Planning and debriefing meetings were held with students throughout the semester. Twelve AUD and 11 SLP students have participated in the AR program over four semesters. A student Canvas site was developed and loaded with resource materials (IDA Institute, 2020). Results Communication, collaboration, roles and responsibilities, and teamwork were assessed. Pre- and post-session ICCAS scores were presented. Results for ICCAS and self-rated skills were provided. Conclusions Conducting AR sessions via Zoom was more beneficial than in-person sessions (e.g., easier access, reached more people, participation of significant others). Group AR via Zoom allowed more students to participate than would have otherwise been possible. Students need very explicit written expectations about working within the IPE framework. Debriefing following each session and written reflections were instrumental in improving performance in subsequent sessions. IPE Implications We conducted qualitative assessments of the students and participants. The main questions were “What went well, what didn’t go well, and what can we change to make it better next time?” The Interprofessional Collaborative Competency Attainment Survey (ICCAS) was used as a pre/post measure. Modified ICCAS administration after the first session reinforces the expectations regarding interprofessional collaboration (students also complete it after the last session). Students completed self-perception rating of twenty relevant skills.

References Council on Academic Accreditation (2016). 2017 Standards for accreditation. Available from http://caa.asha.org/reporting/standards/2017-standards/. Boothroyd, A. (2007). Adult aural rehabilitation: what is it and does it work?. Trends in Amplification, 11(2), 63–71. https://doi.org/10.1177/1084713807301073 IDA Institute (2020). Group Aural Rehabilitation. IDA Institute https://idainstitute.com/tools/group_ar/ Lumague, M., Morgan, A., Mak, D., Hanna, M., Kwong, J., Cameron, C., Zener, D. & Sinclair, L. (2006) Interprofessional education: The student perspective, Journal of Interprofessional Care, 20:3, 246-253. https://doi.org/10.1080/13561820600717891. Preminger J, & Yoo J. (2010) Do group audiologic rehabilitation activities influence psychosocial outcomes? Amer J Audiol 19(2): 109–125. https://doi.org/10.1044/1059-0889(2010/09-0027) World Health Organization (WHO, 2002). Framework for action on interprofessional education And Collaborative practice. Geneva, Switzerland: World Health Organization. Available from https://www.who.int/hrh/resources/framework_action/en/