Presentation Title

Transitioning Children with Autism from Individualized Dental Care to Traditional Dental Settings

Speaker Credentials

PG-Pediatric Dentistry

Speaker Credentials

DDS

College

College of Dental Medicine, Post-Graduate

Location

Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, USA

Format

Poster

Start Date

21-2-2020 8:30 AM

End Date

21-2-2020 4:00 PM

Abstract

Objectives: The objective of this study is to examine characteristics associated with the retention of patients at Nova Southeastern University (NSU) dental clinics. Background: Although children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) develop strong bonds with their pediatric dental provider, as they age, transition to other providers is necessary. Low rates of successful transition, coupled with the need for long term care, highlights the importance of understanding the transition process. Methods: A retrospective chart review of patients with an ASD diagnosis was conducted. Data such as demographics, insurance status, and household income were collected. A logistic regression analysis was conducted to examine patient factors associated with transition to an NSU clinic. Results: Data were collected for 101 children (89.1% male & 10.9% female) required to transition between 2015-2019; Medicaid was the most frequently reported insurance type (68%). In terms of transitions, 42% of patients transitioned to an NSU clinic, 5.9% sought care privately, and the remaining were lost to follow up. Regression analysis indicated that insurance type was significantly associated with transition to NSU. Children with Medicaid were 7 times more likely to transition to an NSU clinic than to seek private care (OR= 7.156; [CI: 2.931, 17.472]; p=0.000). Conclusion: Results demonstrate that insurance may play a major role in a family’s decision to seek care at a facility. Since many studies have shown that Medicaid acceptance is low among private dental care providers, these findings suggest that this may be a major barrier in finding facilities to transition children with ASD. Grants: Funded by Nova Southeastern University, College of Dental Medicine, Health Professions Division and the Health Resources and Services Administration Grant Number D88HP20126.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Feb 21st, 8:30 AM Feb 21st, 4:00 PM

Transitioning Children with Autism from Individualized Dental Care to Traditional Dental Settings

Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, USA

Objectives: The objective of this study is to examine characteristics associated with the retention of patients at Nova Southeastern University (NSU) dental clinics. Background: Although children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) develop strong bonds with their pediatric dental provider, as they age, transition to other providers is necessary. Low rates of successful transition, coupled with the need for long term care, highlights the importance of understanding the transition process. Methods: A retrospective chart review of patients with an ASD diagnosis was conducted. Data such as demographics, insurance status, and household income were collected. A logistic regression analysis was conducted to examine patient factors associated with transition to an NSU clinic. Results: Data were collected for 101 children (89.1% male & 10.9% female) required to transition between 2015-2019; Medicaid was the most frequently reported insurance type (68%). In terms of transitions, 42% of patients transitioned to an NSU clinic, 5.9% sought care privately, and the remaining were lost to follow up. Regression analysis indicated that insurance type was significantly associated with transition to NSU. Children with Medicaid were 7 times more likely to transition to an NSU clinic than to seek private care (OR= 7.156; [CI: 2.931, 17.472]; p=0.000). Conclusion: Results demonstrate that insurance may play a major role in a family’s decision to seek care at a facility. Since many studies have shown that Medicaid acceptance is low among private dental care providers, these findings suggest that this may be a major barrier in finding facilities to transition children with ASD. Grants: Funded by Nova Southeastern University, College of Dental Medicine, Health Professions Division and the Health Resources and Services Administration Grant Number D88HP20126.