Presentation Title

Effect of a Static Magnetic Field on Menstrual Cramp Pain

Speaker Credentials

OMS-II

College

Dr. Kiran C. Patel College of Osteopathic Medicine, DO

Location

Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, USA

Format

Poster

Start Date

21-2-2020 8:30 AM

End Date

21-2-2020 4:00 PM

Abstract

Objective. To evaluate the effectiveness of a concentric multipole magnet with a static magnetic field (SMF) with regard to its ability to reduce dysmenorrhea pain (Menstrual Pain). Background. Magnetic therapy is reported effective in reducing pain using magnets of an array of designs. The use of concentric multipole magnets has been suggested to provide an efficacious design but has never been studied in its ability to rapidly relieve dysmenorrhea pain. Methods. Women with period pain self-rated as ≥6 on the Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS) participated. After rating entry pain, a magnet or sham was secured to an abdominal site close to the largest source of pain for 40 minutes, after which, the pain was again rated. Outcomes were determined by chi square analysis of the number of subjects in whom pain was or was not reduced. Subjects with NPRS ratings reduced by ≥ 35% were scored as having reduced pain. Results.Women (N=24) were evaluated, 14 with magnet and 10 with sham. As of now, 71.4% of those who wore a magnet had a meaningful pain reduction but only 20% of the those who wore a sham received a pain reduction, with the data being statistically significant p Conclusions. If results maintain with the planned 30/group, this magnet type may be an alternative to traditional pain management useful for women unable or unwilling to take medication or as a non-side effect substitute.

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Feb 21st, 8:30 AM Feb 21st, 4:00 PM

Effect of a Static Magnetic Field on Menstrual Cramp Pain

Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, USA

Objective. To evaluate the effectiveness of a concentric multipole magnet with a static magnetic field (SMF) with regard to its ability to reduce dysmenorrhea pain (Menstrual Pain). Background. Magnetic therapy is reported effective in reducing pain using magnets of an array of designs. The use of concentric multipole magnets has been suggested to provide an efficacious design but has never been studied in its ability to rapidly relieve dysmenorrhea pain. Methods. Women with period pain self-rated as ≥6 on the Numeric Pain Rating Scale (NPRS) participated. After rating entry pain, a magnet or sham was secured to an abdominal site close to the largest source of pain for 40 minutes, after which, the pain was again rated. Outcomes were determined by chi square analysis of the number of subjects in whom pain was or was not reduced. Subjects with NPRS ratings reduced by ≥ 35% were scored as having reduced pain. Results.Women (N=24) were evaluated, 14 with magnet and 10 with sham. As of now, 71.4% of those who wore a magnet had a meaningful pain reduction but only 20% of the those who wore a sham received a pain reduction, with the data being statistically significant p Conclusions. If results maintain with the planned 30/group, this magnet type may be an alternative to traditional pain management useful for women unable or unwilling to take medication or as a non-side effect substitute.