Presentation Title

Dysfunctional Movement Patterns Differ Between Male and Female NCAA Division II Athletes

College

Dr. Pallavi Patel College of Health Care Sciences, Bachelor of Science, Exercise and Sport Science

Location

Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, USA

Format

Poster

Start Date

16-2-2018 12:15 PM

End Date

16-2-2018 1:15 PM

Abstract

Objective. This study was conducted to determine differences in dysfunctional movement pattern frequency, as measured by a score of “1” on the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) between male and female collegiate athletes. Background. The FMS consists of 7 tests (scored 1-3 on proficiency) assessing foundational patterns such as stepping, lunging, and squatting. FMS proficiency has been associated with injury risk as well as in-season performance level. Sex differences in FMS scores exist in high school athletes with males scoring higher in the trunk stability push-up (TSPU) test. Differences have not been investigated in collegiate athletes. Results may aid sports medicine professionals in implementing injury prevention strategies. Methods. 275 NCAA Division II intercollegiate athletes (18-27 years; males, n=118; females, n=157) representing 15 teams were FMS assessed during their 2017-2018 pre-participation examinations using standardized procedures. Pearson Chi-square analyses were conducted to examine potential differences in the frequency of “1s” on the 7 tests between sexes, pResults. Significant differences were found in 4/7 tests. Males showed greater dysfunction in the Shoulder Mobility (χ2= 10.821, p=0.001) and the Active Straight Leg Raise (χ2=4.034, p=0.036). Females showed greater dysfunction in the Hurdle Step (χ2=4.610, p=0.033) and Trunk Stability Push-up (χ2=84.347, pConclusion. Significant differences exist in movement pattern dysfunction between the sexes in collegiate athletes. Males had more scores of “1” in tests requiring mobility while females had more in tests requiring stability. Further research should be done to determine the causality of these differences. Grants. This study was not funded.

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Feb 16th, 12:15 PM Feb 16th, 1:15 PM

Dysfunctional Movement Patterns Differ Between Male and Female NCAA Division II Athletes

Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, USA

Objective. This study was conducted to determine differences in dysfunctional movement pattern frequency, as measured by a score of “1” on the Functional Movement Screen (FMS) between male and female collegiate athletes. Background. The FMS consists of 7 tests (scored 1-3 on proficiency) assessing foundational patterns such as stepping, lunging, and squatting. FMS proficiency has been associated with injury risk as well as in-season performance level. Sex differences in FMS scores exist in high school athletes with males scoring higher in the trunk stability push-up (TSPU) test. Differences have not been investigated in collegiate athletes. Results may aid sports medicine professionals in implementing injury prevention strategies. Methods. 275 NCAA Division II intercollegiate athletes (18-27 years; males, n=118; females, n=157) representing 15 teams were FMS assessed during their 2017-2018 pre-participation examinations using standardized procedures. Pearson Chi-square analyses were conducted to examine potential differences in the frequency of “1s” on the 7 tests between sexes, pResults. Significant differences were found in 4/7 tests. Males showed greater dysfunction in the Shoulder Mobility (χ2= 10.821, p=0.001) and the Active Straight Leg Raise (χ2=4.034, p=0.036). Females showed greater dysfunction in the Hurdle Step (χ2=4.610, p=0.033) and Trunk Stability Push-up (χ2=84.347, pConclusion. Significant differences exist in movement pattern dysfunction between the sexes in collegiate athletes. Males had more scores of “1” in tests requiring mobility while females had more in tests requiring stability. Further research should be done to determine the causality of these differences. Grants. This study was not funded.