Presentation Title

Hip and Pelvis Biomechanics during Running as Predictors of Injury in Collegiate Runners: A Prospective Study

Speaker Credentials

Professor

Speaker Credentials

Ph.D.

College

Dr. Pallavi Patel College of Health Care Sciences, Bachelor of Science, Exercise and Sport Science

Location

Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, USA

Format

Podium Presentation

Start Date

16-2-2018 2:15 PM

End Date

16-2-2018 2:45 PM

Abstract

Objective. The objective of the study was to determine if hip and pelvis biomechanics during running could predict musculoskeletal injury (MSI) in collegiate runners. Background. Faulty running biomechanics have been linked to an increased musculoskeletal injury risk in adult, female distance runners. Collegiate runners may benefit from the identification of pathomechanics prior to the start of a season. Methods. Eight female and 7 male (age, 19.8+2.1 yrs; height, 1.66+0.08m; mass, 57.8+7.0kg; 40.2+15.1 miles/wk) healthy, NCAA Division II cross country runners participated in this prospective cohort study. Runners underwent 3D motion analysis of their kinematics [peak hip adduction (HADD), hip internal rotation (HIR), contralateral pelvis drop (CPD)] on an instrumented treadmill prior to the season’s start. Injuries were tracked for an academic year by the teams’ certified athletic trainer via an electronic medical record. Pearson Chi-square analyses were used to determine if MSI could be predicted by HADD, HIR, and CPD, p<.05. Results. Nine runners (75.0%) sustained a total of 27 lower extremity MSI. Runners with excessive HADD were more likely to sustain a MSI (χ2=13.496, p=.036). Injured runners displaced greater HADD peak motion than non-injured, 12.2+4.7 vs 7.4+4.70, respectively. HIR and CPD were not significant predictors of MSI in this group, p>.05. Conclusion. Runners may be at risk for lower extremity MSI if they have increased HADD during running. Collegiate runners may benefit from motion analysis prior to the start of the season as part of an injury prevention strategy to identify pathomechanics. Grants. This study did not receive funding.

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Feb 16th, 2:15 PM Feb 16th, 2:45 PM

Hip and Pelvis Biomechanics during Running as Predictors of Injury in Collegiate Runners: A Prospective Study

Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, USA

Objective. The objective of the study was to determine if hip and pelvis biomechanics during running could predict musculoskeletal injury (MSI) in collegiate runners. Background. Faulty running biomechanics have been linked to an increased musculoskeletal injury risk in adult, female distance runners. Collegiate runners may benefit from the identification of pathomechanics prior to the start of a season. Methods. Eight female and 7 male (age, 19.8+2.1 yrs; height, 1.66+0.08m; mass, 57.8+7.0kg; 40.2+15.1 miles/wk) healthy, NCAA Division II cross country runners participated in this prospective cohort study. Runners underwent 3D motion analysis of their kinematics [peak hip adduction (HADD), hip internal rotation (HIR), contralateral pelvis drop (CPD)] on an instrumented treadmill prior to the season’s start. Injuries were tracked for an academic year by the teams’ certified athletic trainer via an electronic medical record. Pearson Chi-square analyses were used to determine if MSI could be predicted by HADD, HIR, and CPD, p<.05. Results. Nine runners (75.0%) sustained a total of 27 lower extremity MSI. Runners with excessive HADD were more likely to sustain a MSI (χ2=13.496, p=.036). Injured runners displaced greater HADD peak motion than non-injured, 12.2+4.7 vs 7.4+4.70, respectively. HIR and CPD were not significant predictors of MSI in this group, p>.05. Conclusion. Runners may be at risk for lower extremity MSI if they have increased HADD during running. Collegiate runners may benefit from motion analysis prior to the start of the season as part of an injury prevention strategy to identify pathomechanics. Grants. This study did not receive funding.