Presentation Title

National Level Analysis of Opioids-Related Death and Hospital Adverse Drug Events, 2009-2014

Speaker Credentials

Ph.D. in Pharmacy

Speaker Credentials

PharmD

College

College of Pharmacy

Location

Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, USA

Format

Poster

Start Date

16-2-2018 12:15 PM

End Date

16-2-2018 1:15 PM

Abstract

Objective. This study was conducted to determine the national rates of prescription opioids health outcomes including overdose death and opioids-related adverse drug events (ADEs) during hospitalization. Background. Opioid use is associated with major consequences, that affect patients in both inpatient and outpatient settings, including overdose, oversedation, respiratory depression and death. In 2015, prescription opioids overdose death was responsible for over 40% of the total drug overdose deaths in the United States. Among hospitalized patients, opioids were used in 51% of the patients and the risk of death was more than 3 times higher in patients who encountered opioids-related ADEs. Methods. This study was an exploratory retrospective analysis of two prescription opioids health outcomes from 2009 to 2014. The National Vital Statistics Mortality files (NVSM) were used to obtain data on the national rate of prescription opioid overdose deaths using ICD-10[FS1] codes. The National Inpatient Sample (NIS) data were used to explore the national rate of opioids-related hospital ADEs using ICD-9 codes to extract the data and identify the study population. Results. The average national rate was approximately 17,360 deaths/year for opioids overdose death and over 31,545 events/year for opioids-related hospital ADEs. Thirteen percent of these ADEs were present on admission, and 2 percent were associated with death during hospitalization. Conclusion. Prescription opioids health related outcomes including overdose deaths and adverse drug events were common in both inpatient and outpatient settings. Grants. This study was partially funded by a grant from the Health Profession Division (HPD) at Nova Southeastern University.

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Feb 16th, 12:15 PM Feb 16th, 1:15 PM

National Level Analysis of Opioids-Related Death and Hospital Adverse Drug Events, 2009-2014

Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, USA

Objective. This study was conducted to determine the national rates of prescription opioids health outcomes including overdose death and opioids-related adverse drug events (ADEs) during hospitalization. Background. Opioid use is associated with major consequences, that affect patients in both inpatient and outpatient settings, including overdose, oversedation, respiratory depression and death. In 2015, prescription opioids overdose death was responsible for over 40% of the total drug overdose deaths in the United States. Among hospitalized patients, opioids were used in 51% of the patients and the risk of death was more than 3 times higher in patients who encountered opioids-related ADEs. Methods. This study was an exploratory retrospective analysis of two prescription opioids health outcomes from 2009 to 2014. The National Vital Statistics Mortality files (NVSM) were used to obtain data on the national rate of prescription opioid overdose deaths using ICD-10[FS1] codes. The National Inpatient Sample (NIS) data were used to explore the national rate of opioids-related hospital ADEs using ICD-9 codes to extract the data and identify the study population. Results. The average national rate was approximately 17,360 deaths/year for opioids overdose death and over 31,545 events/year for opioids-related hospital ADEs. Thirteen percent of these ADEs were present on admission, and 2 percent were associated with death during hospitalization. Conclusion. Prescription opioids health related outcomes including overdose deaths and adverse drug events were common in both inpatient and outpatient settings. Grants. This study was partially funded by a grant from the Health Profession Division (HPD) at Nova Southeastern University.