Presentation Title

Discrepancies between Self-Reported Exercise and Actual Physical Fitness Levels: a Review of Low, Moderate and Vigorous Exercise

Speaker Credentials

BS-ESS

Speaker Credentials

BS

College

Dr. Pallavi Patel College of Health Care Sciences, Bachelor of Science, Exercise and Sport Science

Location

Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, USA

Format

Poster

Start Date

16-2-2018 12:15 PM

End Date

16-2-2018 1:15 PM

Abstract

No clear patterns have been determined in the relationship between self-reported physical activity and actual values; however, there have been occasional trends seen based on the amount of physical activity employed, the level at which one trains, and gender. The purpose of this study was to compare the differences between men and women in self-reported responses on the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (I-PAQ) and their actual physical fitness levels. The Forty-two men and 91 women filled out the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) and participated in the following fitness assessments: body composition (three-site skinfold), handgrip strength, pushups, plank, VO2 (Rockport fitness submax), and sit & reach. RESULTS: Self-reported physical activity levels were correlated with all physical fitness assessments in females except handgrip. Not a single physical fitness measurement was correlated with self-reported exercise in males, indicating either a deliberate or subconscious discrepancy between self-reported exercise levels and actual exercise levels.

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Feb 16th, 12:15 PM Feb 16th, 1:15 PM

Discrepancies between Self-Reported Exercise and Actual Physical Fitness Levels: a Review of Low, Moderate and Vigorous Exercise

Nova Southeastern University, Davie, Florida, USA

No clear patterns have been determined in the relationship between self-reported physical activity and actual values; however, there have been occasional trends seen based on the amount of physical activity employed, the level at which one trains, and gender. The purpose of this study was to compare the differences between men and women in self-reported responses on the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (I-PAQ) and their actual physical fitness levels. The Forty-two men and 91 women filled out the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ) and participated in the following fitness assessments: body composition (three-site skinfold), handgrip strength, pushups, plank, VO2 (Rockport fitness submax), and sit & reach. RESULTS: Self-reported physical activity levels were correlated with all physical fitness assessments in females except handgrip. Not a single physical fitness measurement was correlated with self-reported exercise in males, indicating either a deliberate or subconscious discrepancy between self-reported exercise levels and actual exercise levels.