Presentation Title

Visual Needs of School Aged Children with Autism: Are They Truly Different?

Speaker Credentials

BS

College

College of Optometry

Location

Signature Grand, Davie, Florida, USA

Format

Poster

Start Date

25-4-2008 12:00 AM

End Date

25-4-2008 12:00 AM

Abstract

Purpose. Due to physical, emotional and mental impairments, autistic patients can be challenging to examine. Knowledge concerning their visually related daily activities allows the doctor to better tailor the examination to the individual. Are the visual needs of the school aged autistic different than non-autistic children? This study will investigate that question. Methods. Information concerning visual care and parent perceptions was collected from a survey of parents, and guardians caring for children and adults with autism. This survey consisted of a series of yes/no and lickert scale questions. Surveys were collected from two sources: Baudhuin Preschool at the Mailman Segal Institute, National Alliance Autism Research (NAAR) charity/awareness walk, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. Surveys could be completed by hand and via a website. For the purpose of this study, school aged is defined at 6 years of age and above. Results. 32 out of 68 complete surveys fit the age requirement for participation. 26 attended public education, 4 private and 2 did not respond. Out of the 26 public school selections, 17 are mainstreamed. Participation in the following visually taxing activities were questioned: reading-18 subjects (56%), writing-14 (44%), computer work-21 (65%), hand-held video games (PSP, game boy)-18 (56%), TV monitor based video games (Playstation, Nintendo)-15 (47%). 13 subjects (41%) responded that they participated in reading, writing and computer work. 12 out of the 32 respondents take part in sports. Basketball (7 out of 12) had the largest involvement. Conclusion. With the recent rise in the rates of autism spectrum disorders, optometrists must be part of the diagnosis and treatment team. As with other populations with special needs, autistic patients require more time and energy on the part of the doctor to examine. This study shows that despite physical and mental barriers that exist, autistic children have the same visual needs as non-autistic children.

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 25th, 12:00 AM Apr 25th, 12:00 AM

Visual Needs of School Aged Children with Autism: Are They Truly Different?

Signature Grand, Davie, Florida, USA

Purpose. Due to physical, emotional and mental impairments, autistic patients can be challenging to examine. Knowledge concerning their visually related daily activities allows the doctor to better tailor the examination to the individual. Are the visual needs of the school aged autistic different than non-autistic children? This study will investigate that question. Methods. Information concerning visual care and parent perceptions was collected from a survey of parents, and guardians caring for children and adults with autism. This survey consisted of a series of yes/no and lickert scale questions. Surveys were collected from two sources: Baudhuin Preschool at the Mailman Segal Institute, National Alliance Autism Research (NAAR) charity/awareness walk, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida. Surveys could be completed by hand and via a website. For the purpose of this study, school aged is defined at 6 years of age and above. Results. 32 out of 68 complete surveys fit the age requirement for participation. 26 attended public education, 4 private and 2 did not respond. Out of the 26 public school selections, 17 are mainstreamed. Participation in the following visually taxing activities were questioned: reading-18 subjects (56%), writing-14 (44%), computer work-21 (65%), hand-held video games (PSP, game boy)-18 (56%), TV monitor based video games (Playstation, Nintendo)-15 (47%). 13 subjects (41%) responded that they participated in reading, writing and computer work. 12 out of the 32 respondents take part in sports. Basketball (7 out of 12) had the largest involvement. Conclusion. With the recent rise in the rates of autism spectrum disorders, optometrists must be part of the diagnosis and treatment team. As with other populations with special needs, autistic patients require more time and energy on the part of the doctor to examine. This study shows that despite physical and mental barriers that exist, autistic children have the same visual needs as non-autistic children.