Faculty Articles

Title

A Comparison of the Use and Quality of Antidiabetic Medication Regimens Between Non-Hispanic Black and White Adults With Uncontrolled Type 2 Diabetes in the US: NHANES 2003-2012

ISBN or ISSN

1554-6063

Publication Title

The Diabetes Educator

Volume

42

Issue

2

Publication Date / Copyright Date

4-4-2016

First Page

234

Last Page

242

Publisher

American Association of Diabetes Educators

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the use of clinical guideline-recommended antidiabetic therapies among whites and blacks with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes.

Methods: A secondary data analysis based on NHANES 2003-2012 cohort data including non-Hispanic black and white adults with uncontrolled (A1C ≥6.5%) type 2 diabetes.

Results: Blacks were more likely to have the highest levels of A1C compared to whites (A1C >9% = 29.8% vs 16.2%). There was no statistical difference in the use of recommended regimens across racial group (blacks 60.5% vs whites 66.0%). Blacks and whites who were most uncontrolled were least likely to be on recommended regimens (A1C 6.5%-7.4%: 78.5%, A1C 7.5%-9%: 57.2%; and A1C >9%: 54.1%). This pattern was most pronounced among blacks compared to whites but was not statistically different. Use of recommended therapies decreased 29.0 percentage points for blacks and 20.1 percentage points among whites from an A1C level of 6.5% to 7.4% to >9%, respectively. The total proportion of blacks and whites on intensified non-insulin triple or insulin-based therapies were 38.9% and 41.8%, respectively.

Conclusions: Even though blacks were more likely than whites to have the highest A1C, no significant differences were found in the use of clinical-guideline recommended regimens or other regimen use outcomes. Along with lifestyle modification, further intensification of antidiabetic regimens may help improve glycemic control and other disparities between blacks and whites.

Disciplines

Medicine and Health Sciences | Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences

Keywords

adult, African Americans, aged, blood glucose, diabetes mellitus, type 2, European continental ancestry group, female, humans, hypoglycemic agents, insulin, male, middle aged, nutrition surveys, united states, young adult

Peer Reviewed

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