Faculty Articles

Title

Hypothesis: Paroxetine, a G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 (GRK2) Inhibitor Reduces Morbidity and Mortality in Patients With Heart Failure.

ISBN or ISSN

1533-4023

Publication Title

Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology

Volume

22

Issue

1

Publication Date / Copyright Date

1-1-2017

First Page

51

Last Page

53

Publisher

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

DOI Number

10.1177/1074248416644350

Abstract

The hypothesis that paroxetine decreases morbidity and mortality in patients with heart failure (HF) is plausible but unproven. Basic research demonstrates that inhibition of G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) both in vitro and in vivo in the myocardium may be beneficial. G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 antagonism is purported to exert cardioprotective effects immediately following myocardial injury by blunting toxic overstimulation on a recently injured heart. In addition, chronic overexpression of GRK2 inhibits catecholamine induction of vital positive chronotropic and ionotropic effects required to preserve cardiac output leading to worsening of congestive HF. In cardiac-specific GRK2 conditional knockout mice, there is significant improvement in left ventricular wall thickness, left ventricular end-diastolic diameter (LVEDD), and ejection fraction (EF) compared to controls. Paroxetine is a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor which was recently shown to have the ability to directly inhibit GRK2 both in vitro and in vivo. At physiologic temperatures, paroxetine inhibits GRK2-dependent phosphorylation of an activated G-protein-coupled receptor with a half maximal inhibitory concentration of 35 micromoles, a substantially greater affinity than for other G protein-coupled receptor kinases. In a randomized trial in mice with systolic HF and depressed EF postmyocardial infarction, those treated with paroxetine had a 30% increase in EF, improved contractility, and LVEDD and wall thickness compared to those treated with medical therapy alone. While further basic research may continue to elucidate plausible mechanisms of benefit and observational studies will contribute important relevant information, large scale randomized trials designed a priori to do so are necessary to test the hypothesis.

Disciplines

Medicine and Health Sciences | Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences

Keywords

congestive heart failure; experimental and clinical heart failure; experimental cardiology; heart disease; heart failure; heart failure—cellular and subcellular mechanisms; ischemic

Peer Reviewed

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