Presentation Title

The Mighty Mite: A Literature Review on the Diagnosis of Scabies

Speaker Credentials

MS-II

Speaker Credentials

Ph.D.

College

College of Allopathic Medicine

Format

Poster

Start Date

6-11-2020 2:00 PM

End Date

6-11-2020 2:15 PM

Abstract

The Mighty Mite: A Literature Review on the Diagnosis of Scabies Qaas Shoukat, MS-II, College of Allopathic MedicineAlgevis Wrench, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, College of Allopathic Medicine Objective: This study was conducted in order to evaluate the efficacy of current diagnostic measures for scabies infections. Background: Scabies, the infection caused by Sarcoptes scabiei mites, is a highly contagious parasitic disease characterized by intense itching and multiple types of skin lesions. Infection with the scabies mite has a significant disease burden throughout the world, with an estimate incidence of over 200 million annual cases. Scabies has been historically difficult to diagnose, and while several countries and worldwide organizations have developed diagnostic guidelines, no such guidelines have been developed or widely recommended in the United States. Methods: A literature review was conducted using the Medline, Pubmed, and Neglected Tropical Diseases databases. Eligible papers were those published after the year 2000 to present, published in English, and focusing on the diagnosis of scabies. Results: Currently, the diagnosis of scabies is mostly made via a correlation of clinical symptoms in conjunction with other techniques such as dermatoscopy (Sensitivity: 43.47%, Specificity: 84.41%) skin biopsies (Sensitivity: 43.47%, Specificity: 100%), adhesive tape tests (Sensitivity: 69.56%, Specificity: 100%) and PCR antigen detection (37.9% sensitivity, Specificity: 100%). The diagnostic efficacy of other modalities is difficult to quantify due to limited research. Conclusions: The overall efficacies of the diagnostic modalities differ based on the similarity of scabies to other skin conditions, the difficulty to obtain a viable sample, and the cost and availability of necessary equipment. There is a need for national guidelines to be developed in the United States. Grants: No grants were used in this study.

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Nov 6th, 2:00 PM Nov 6th, 2:15 PM

The Mighty Mite: A Literature Review on the Diagnosis of Scabies

The Mighty Mite: A Literature Review on the Diagnosis of Scabies Qaas Shoukat, MS-II, College of Allopathic MedicineAlgevis Wrench, Ph.D., Assistant Professor, College of Allopathic Medicine Objective: This study was conducted in order to evaluate the efficacy of current diagnostic measures for scabies infections. Background: Scabies, the infection caused by Sarcoptes scabiei mites, is a highly contagious parasitic disease characterized by intense itching and multiple types of skin lesions. Infection with the scabies mite has a significant disease burden throughout the world, with an estimate incidence of over 200 million annual cases. Scabies has been historically difficult to diagnose, and while several countries and worldwide organizations have developed diagnostic guidelines, no such guidelines have been developed or widely recommended in the United States. Methods: A literature review was conducted using the Medline, Pubmed, and Neglected Tropical Diseases databases. Eligible papers were those published after the year 2000 to present, published in English, and focusing on the diagnosis of scabies. Results: Currently, the diagnosis of scabies is mostly made via a correlation of clinical symptoms in conjunction with other techniques such as dermatoscopy (Sensitivity: 43.47%, Specificity: 84.41%) skin biopsies (Sensitivity: 43.47%, Specificity: 100%), adhesive tape tests (Sensitivity: 69.56%, Specificity: 100%) and PCR antigen detection (37.9% sensitivity, Specificity: 100%). The diagnostic efficacy of other modalities is difficult to quantify due to limited research. Conclusions: The overall efficacies of the diagnostic modalities differ based on the similarity of scabies to other skin conditions, the difficulty to obtain a viable sample, and the cost and availability of necessary equipment. There is a need for national guidelines to be developed in the United States. Grants: No grants were used in this study.